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Protest takes place against Javelin Park incinerator

Protesters gather at the demonstration against the incinerator Credit: ITV News

A protest was held outside Gloucestershire County Council this morning where a petition of more than 7,000 signatures against the proposed Javelin Park waste incinerator was handed in.

Councillors will then vote on a motion to scrap the incinerator contract. Shire Hall had agreed a contract with Ubaser Balfour Beatty to build and operate the waste incinerator but eventually refused planning permission after a strong public backlash.

But after months of delays, Secretary of State Eric Pickles approved its construction after an appeal by the waste firm.

Developer: incinerator will create 300 construction jobs

The developers of the waste incinerator planned at Javelin Park on the outskirts of Gloucester say it will create 300 construction jobs and around 40 permanent jobs when the project is completed.

Urbaser Balfour Beatty (UBB) say the plant will generate enough electricity to power approximately 26,000 homes. It will be fuelled by waste that would otherwise go to landfill, and save council tax payers £150m over 25 years.

“We are delighted with the Secretary of State’s decision to agree to the construction of the facility. The proposals were found to be in-line with the relevant planning policy and Gloucestershire County Council’s Waste Core Strategy.

“We will be working with Gloucestershire County Council to make sure the project brings as many opportunities for the local people and the economy as possible and make a positive contribution to the effects of climate change.”

– Javier Peiro, UBB


Stroud District Council 'disappointed' with incinerator decision

Stroud District Council has expressed its disappointment following the decision by Secretary of State Eric Pickles to give planning permission for the waste incinerator at Javelin Park, in Haresfield.

The district council had objected to the incinerator due to its impact on the adjacent area of outstanding natural beauty, its impact on the nearby Hunts Grove development and the inefficiency of the solution when compared to other options in terms of converting waste to energy and minimising carbon emissions.

"This is a real disappointment; however we hope that the recent appraisal of alternative options by Gloucestershire County Council will see it review its intentions.

"Whilst permission has been given, they could still opt for a solution to deal with waste which maximises recycling, maintains flexibility and minimises the impact on the environment and taxpayers’ purses.

"The case against adding more incineration capacity in the UK has become stronger and stronger and we and all the other districts should be able to work together with the county council to deliver the best solution for the future."

– Stroud District Council leader Cllr Geoff Wheeler

Government overrules Gloucestershire County Council on waste incinerator plan

The huge incinerator will be built at Javelin Park Credit: ITV News West Country

The Communities Secretary Eric Pickles has overruled Gloucestershire County Council to give permission for an incinerator to treat 150,000 tonnes of household waste.

Urbaser Balfour Beatty (UBB) was awarded a contract to design and build the facility at Javelin Park in February 2013. However, the county council's planning committee refused planning permission and UBB appealed to the Secretary of State.

Residents nearby claim the development will be the size of Gloucester Cathedral with a 70m high chimney looming over homes.

Currently over half of residents' household waste is sent to landfill, which creates harmful greenhouse gases and in 2013/14 cost £9 million in tax.

The facility will make an important change in the way Gloucestershire deals with the household waste of its 600,000 residents, diverting over 92 per cent of waste from landfill. The council says it will make a significant impact on tackling climate change by removing 40,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide and save local people more than £150million over the next 25 years.

"Today's decision means the rubbish we can't recycle can be disposed of in a safe and environmentally friendly way.

"Our aim is to reach 70 per cent recycling across the county and stop burying waste in the ground completely. As well as this new facility, Gloucestershire will also be using anaerobic digestion to treat food waste and recycling more. This all takes us a huge step closer."

– Cllr Ray Theodoulou, Gloucestershire County Council

'Plan B' for Gloucester's waste

Gloucester City Council has voted to set up a committee to look into a 'plan B' for waste disposal in the county.

It follows a recent decision by the planning committee to reject an application to build a waste incinerator at Javelin Park.

The committee will now look at other methods of disposing household waste such as the mechanical and biological systems already used at Avonmouth in Bristol.

Company behind rejected incinerator to appeal

The company behind a controversial waste incinerator that was turned down by councillors in Gloucester say they will appeal the decision.

Urbaser Balfour Beatty wanted to build the £500m plant at Javelin Park. More than a hundred people packed a meeting last night, which lasted 11 hours.

Our Gloucestershire correspondent Ken Goodwin reports:


Council's waste champion admits he's disappointed

In his first interview since Gloucestershire County Council's planning committee unanimously voted against plans for the incinerator at Javelin Park, Councillor Stan Waddington, the council's waste champion, admits that he is disappointed.

He has been a fervent supporter of the waste incinerator scheme, and still thinks it is the best way of getting rid of waste:

No decision yet on proposed Gloucester incinerator

More than a hundred people packed a planning meeting today, where councillors were deciding whether or not to give the go-ahead to a hugely controversial waste incinerator near Gloucester.

Protesters claim the £500 million facility at Javelin Park at Haresfield will be bigger than Gloucester Cathedral.

But the council says it's right to consider other alternatives to using landfill. Here's our Gloucestershire Correspondent, Ken Goodwin:

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