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Sandiford Lawyer: Government has human rights 'duty'

The Government has a duty to ensure that the human rights of British citizens are protected and that those sentenced to death, or suspected of or charged with a crime for which capital punishment may be imposed, have adequate legal assistance at all stages of the proceedings.

"This judicial review will challenge the Government's refusal to fund the £2,500 in expenses it would cost for a qualified Indonesian lawyer to represent Lindsay in her appeal against execution by firing squad which will take place on the beach in Bali if the Government do not act."

– Richard Stein, Leigh Day law firm

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Government "strongly objects" to Gloucestershire woman's death penalty sentence

Foreign Office Minister and East Devon MP Hugo Swire has told MPs the Government "strongly object to the death penalty" after a woman from Gloucestershire was sentenced to be executed for drug trafficking in Indonesia. He said:

We are aware that Lindsay Sandiford is facing the death penalty in Indonesia. We strongly object to the death penalty and continue to provide consular assistance to Lindsay and her family during this difficult time.

– Hugo Swire MP

Mr Swire said "repeated representations" had been made to the Indonesian authorities and Foreign Secretary William Hague had raised the case with his counterpart in the country.

He added: "

We understand that under Indonesian law, Lindsay has at least two further avenues of appeal through the courts as well as an opportunity to apply for presidential clemency should these be unsuccessful.

– Hugo Swire MP

Sandiford had previously lived in Cheltenham. The town's liberal democrat MP Martin Horwood said Sandiford had "struggled with legal representation" and called for her to receive the "best possible consular support" from UK officials in Indonesia.

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MP: Indonesia 'behaving wrongly' over death penalty

Lindsay Sandiford's MP says the sentence has come as a shock to a lot of people, and he's aiming to raise the issue with Foreign Secretary, William Hague. Martin Horwood, the MP for Cheltenham where Lindsay Sandiford once lived, said the death penalty should be a thing of the past:

This is not the way that a country that now values democracy and human rights should really be behaving. I imagine all those who know Lindsay will be extremely worried and concerned about this development.

When the prosecutors asked for something less than the death sentence, for a custodial sentence, then I guess I'm afraid some of us perhaps relaxed a little and this has come as a real shock that the judges have actually delivered a sentence which is obviously much, much harsher than the one that was actually requested by prosecutors.

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Sandiford 'the lives of my children were in danger'

Sandiford previously told the court she became involved only because "the lives of my children were in danger".

I would like to begin by apologising to the Republic of Indonesia and the Indonesian people for my involvement.

I would never have become involved in something like this but the lives of my children were in danger and I felt I had to protect them.

– Lindsay Sandiford, Witness Statement

Smuggled cocaine worth 2.5m US dollars

Sandiford, 56, was sentenced after being found guilty of violating the country's strict drug laws by the Denpasar District Court today.

In the court's verdict, a judge panel headed by Amser Simanjuntak, concluded that Sandiford has damaged the image of Bali as a tourism destination and weakened the government's programme of drug annihilation.

The cocaine she smuggled was worth around 2.5 million US dollars, the Associated Press reported.

Prosecutors had said during the trial last month that they were seeking a 15-year prison term, and not pursuing the maximum penalty for drug trafficking which is death.

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