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Father of soldier who died after training says he hasn't had an apology

A coroner is considering her verdict into the deaths of three reservist soldiers who died on an SAS selection exercise.

Corporal James Dunsby from Trowbridge was one of the three who was killed after overheating on the march in the Brecon Beacons in July 2013.

His father has told ITV News he hasn't had an apology, and the SAS let his son down. Alexandra Lodge met him on the route of his son's fatal march.

Father of soldier who died after training shown wrong place of son's collapse

Cpl James Dunsby died of heatstroke in July 2013, along with two other army reservists. Credit: Ministry of Defence

The father of a soldier from Trowbridge, who died after an SAS test march on the Brecon Beacons, was taken to the wrong place when he asked to see where his son had collapsed.

The error was revealed during the questioning of an SAS training officer at an inquest into the death of Corporal James Dunsby and two other reservists.

The soldier being questioned said there was "no rhyme or reason why that should have been done."

Corporal Dunsby, a trained combat medic and Afghanistan veteran, died of heatstroke in hospital in July 2013, 17 days after collapsing on the training march.

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Hiker tried to help Trowbridge soldier before he collapsed on Brecon Beacons

James Dunsby died in July 2013, two weeks after collapsing on the Brecon Beacons. Credit: ITV News

A civilian passer-by was asked to fan down a heat-stricken Army reservist from Trowbridge who died after collapsing on an SAS test march, an inquest has heard.

The walker, who was not named at the hearing into the deaths of three reservists, was also instructed to hold the head of Corporal James Dunsby while four other soldiers carried him on a stretcher.

Cpl Dunsby, 31, died at Birmingham's Queen Elizabeth Hospital in July 2013, two weeks after collapsing on the Brecon Beacons.

Cpl Dunsby, who collapsed from heat illness near a main road, is said to have been moving "between running and a fast walk" on the final leg of the march. Another candidate for the reserve SAS, known by the codename 4Y, told the inquest earlier: "He ran on ahead, saying he could make the time. I said to him, 'I'm sorry, I can't. I can't go at that pace' and that is the last time I saw him."

In a statement read to the court by the coroner, a senior paramedic with 23 years of experience said Cpl Dunsby's temperature was the highest he had ever encountered.

The inquest continues.

Army medic didn't read guidelines for training in which three died

Corporal James Dunsby was an Afghanistan veteran, intelligence analyst and trained combat medic. Credit: Ministry of Defence

A combat medic didn't read Ministry of Defence guidelines on preventing deaths from heat injury before a fatal SAS test march.

The soldier, who cannot be named, told an inquest he hadn't "really looked" at service guidance advising that military exercises should be called off if a heat injury is diagnosed.

Corporal James Dunsby from Bath died from the effects of the heat, along with two other soldiers, during a march in boiling temperatures in the Brecon Beacons in July 2013.

The inquest continues.

At least 12 overheated during SAS training in which three died

Corporal James Dunsby was an Afghanistan veteran, intelligence analyst and trained combat medic. Credit: Ministry of Defence

At least 12 soldiers were treated for heat-related illnesses on an SAS test march in the Brecon Beacons, an inquest into the deaths of three of them has heard.

Craig Roberts, Edward Maher and James Dunsby, who was from Bath, all died from overheating in 2013.

Today the Chief Instructor of their unit said he was unaware of official military guidelines stating that even one person becoming incapacitated through heat injury should stop the activity.

Soldier describes pressure of SAS training in which three died

Cpl James Dunsby died in 2013. Credit: Ministry of Defence

A soldier who collapsed during an SAS selection process in which three died told an inquest today how he was encouraged to complete the march - despite army medics fearing he could die.

The soldier, known only as 1W, described collapsing three times after running out of water. He said he felt dizzy, weak, sick and confused - and his nose started to bleed.

Afghanistan veteran Corporal James Dunsby from Bath was also taking part on the day in 2013. He died along with two colleagues.

Cpl Dunsby's widow gave testified yesterday, on the opening day of the hearing. She told the inquest her husband, an army reservist and trained combat medic, had had an "exceptionally high level of fitness".

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Inquest to hear from soldier's colleague

Corporal James Dunsby. Credit: Ministry of Defence

An inquest into the death of a soldier from Bath who died during an SAS training exercise is expecting to hear more evidence from a soldier who was training alongside him.

Corporal James Dunsby was one of three men who died during an SAS selection process which took place on a hot day in the Brecon Beacons.

The 31-year-old collapsed in the heat and died in hospital two weeks later.

Around 50 people are expected to give evidence during the inquest over the next month.

Soldier who died after training exercise had 'exceptionally high' fitness

James Dunsby's widow paid tribute to him at the inquest into his death. Credit: Ministry of Defence

The widow of a soldier from Bath who died after an SAS training exercise has told an inquest he had "an exceptionally high level of fitness".

Bryher Dunsby said Corporal James Dunsby, a 31-year-old Afghanistan veteran and MoD intelligence analyst was an army reservist and trained combat medic who knew how to look after himself for a training exercise, including drinking enough water.

In emotional testimony she described her husband as "handsome", "charming" and "good at everything", and said, turning to the coroner, "I have to do right by him".

Cpl Dunsby and two other reservists collapsed during a military exercise in the Brecon Beacons in July 2013, on what was forecast to be the hottest day of the year.

One of the men, 24-year-old Corporal Craig Roberts, was pronounced dead on the mountainside, while Cpl Dunsby and Lance Corporal Edward Maher, 31, were taken to hospital, where both eventually died.

The families of all three are attending the inquest, which is set to last for four weeks and hear evidence on the training exercise's preparation and treatment of the reservists.

Senior coroner Louise Hunt said the hearing must ensure "the full facts are brought to light".

"He was very charming, he was sort of a delightful, eccentric mix between Flashman, a PG Wodehouse novel and a Noel Coward play ... He was so likeable, James was very popular and never had any problems making friends.

"He was academic and an exceptional all-rounder ... He was good at sport, highly academic - he was just good at everything."

– Bryher Dunsby paid tribute to her husband

Inquest into Bath soldier's death after training exercise

Cpl Dunsby was a member of the Army Reserves (The Royal Yeomanry). Credit: MoD

An inquest opens today into the death of a soldier from Bath who died after a training exercise, along with two others.

Corporal James Dunsby was one of three men who collapsed during an SAS selection process which took place on a hot day on the Brecon Beacons.

The 31-year-old collapsed in the heat and died in hospital two weeks later.

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Family 'devastated' by Ellement inquest adjournment

Kirsten Heaven, who represents Cpl Ellement's two sisters, told the inquest: "The family are devastated and upset this disclosure has come so late in the day."

Khristina Swain (left), sister of Corporal Anne-Marie Ellement and her mother Alexandra Barritt (centre) speak to reporters. Credit: Press Association

Adjourning proceedings until Monday morning, the coroner said there was a "danger" in pursuing information which was "unrealistic to find" and which may be of little relevance to the inquest.

"I suggest all urgency is given to track down any missing documents," Mr Rheinberg said.

"I'm going to grant the application (for adjournment) on strict and immediate terms."

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