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Yeovil Hospital downgraded from black to red alert

The severe pressure on emergency services at Yeovil District Hospital has eased slightly, with the hospital no longer at "black alert".

The alert status has now been downgraded to "red alert", the second highest possible level of severity. The hospital is still very busy and says it is facing significant operational challenges.

Black alert occurs when the hospital can no longer deal with the number of patients coming into A&E because too few are being discharged.

HOSPITALS STILL ON BLACK ALERT

  • Southmead Hospital
  • the BRI
  • Bristol Royal Hospital for Children
  • Weston General Hospital

WHAT DOES RED ALERT MEAN?

A hospital on red alert means that wards are still very busy with limited bed space. All non-urgent work and clinics are usually cancelled so that resourced can be concentrated on the emergency services.

It also means urgent actions are required across the local health system by all partners to prevent the hospital going into black alert.

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  1. Katie Rowlett

NHS managers in the West say they 'can cope' with demand this winter

NHS managers in the West say they 'can cope' with demand Credit: PA:Lynne Cameron

There are around 40,000 deaths every year because of the cold, mainly in elderly.

It's down to simple things like people not heating their homes to at least 18°C. Just by doing this you can prevent respiratory illnesses but also colds and flu.

But also when we get a cold snap there is an Increase in fractures due to snow and ice, which also puts pressure on our A and E departments and hospital beds.

Normally NHS England South West is given its winter money now, but this year it was provided by the Government in April so health managers have been able to plan earlier.

NHS England South West says this year health and social care services have been joined up so there will not be as many bed blocking situations like we've seen in previous years.

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Man loses leg after hospital failings

A Bristol man has been compensated after a routine operation led to him having his left leg amputated.

Michael Stephenson, from Whitchurch, caught an infection following hip surgery in 2009.

The North Bristol NHS Trust has admitted negligence and compensated the 53 year-old, but he says surgeons need to be held accountable.

Man has leg amputated after hospital failings

Man has leg amputated after hospital failings Credit: ITV News

Failures at a Bristol hospital led to a man having to have his entire leg amputated after an infection following routine surgery.

Michael Stephenson, who's from Whitchurch, used to be an active man who's life was on the rugby pitch but six years ago a complication after a straight forward procedure on his hip meant his leg had to be amputated.

On the 20th July 2009 that Michael went into Southmead Hospital to have the routine procedure.

Five days later, the 53 year old should had been discharged but says the wound hadn't healed and there were signs of infection. It took more than a week for doctors to spot it, but it was then too late.

Over four years Michael had countless operations spending a total of two years in hospital. Until doctors finally decided to amputate his entire leg on 24th July 2013

The hospital apologised for the incident and admitted liability.

The Trust is pleased that agreement has now been reached and settlement achieved in relation to the injuries Mr Stephenson suffered.

Since liability was admitted in 2012, we have been working with Mr Stephenson’s legal team to establish his needs.

We hope that the compensation received will assist with Mr Stephenson's care and improve his quality of life.

We would like to re-iterate the apologies made in 2012 and offer Mr Stephenson and his family our best wishes for the future.

– North Bristol NHS Trust
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