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Primary school places - has your child got theirs?

It is a big day for thousands of children as they discover which primary school they'll be going to in September

A break down of the school figures from all our major councils.

We'll have more as we get them.

North Somerset Council:

  • 86% allocated a place at their first preference school, 6.7% their second and 2.8% their third.
  • 95.5% received one of their three preferences. (Compared to 94.9% last year.)
  • 111 students out of 2,463 applications have not been offered any of their preferences. (Compared to 118 last year.)

Bristol City Council:

  • 84% received their first school preference. (Compared to 82% last year.)
  • 95.6% received one of their three preferences. (Compared to 94% last year.)
  • On-time applications dropped slightly this year to 5,404 down from 5,461 last year.

Gloucester City Council:

  • 88% have been offered their first preference (Compared to almost 90% last year.)
  • 96% have received one of their three preferred places.

Swindon Borough Council:

  • 93% have been offered their first preference. (Compared to 92% last year.)
  • 98.1% received one of their three preferences. (Compared to 98% last year.)

Bath and North East Somerset:

  • 88% have been offered their first preference.

Last day for primary school applications

Parents have until the end of the day to apply for primary school places for their children in September.

In Bristol, there are fears that a big rise in the number of children starting school will cause problems but the council says it has had extra funding to provide more places.

Gloucestershire county council says nearly 90 percent got their first choice last year.

In Bristol, there are fears that a big rise in the number of children starting school will cause problems. Credit: PA

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Parents in Weston-Super-Mare unhappy with primary school choices

A group of parents from Somerset are vowing to fight their local authority over the choice of primary school given to their children. Some have been offered alternatives more than two miles away when they live within just 300 metres of their preferred school.

The problem seems to have arisen in Weston-Super-Mare because plans to create a new primary school didn't get funding at the last minute. It comes amid an admissions crisis across the UK as a baby boom and immigration put pressure on primary schools.