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Weather warning in place for Monday as South West feels Ophelia's aftermath

A yellow weather warning has been issued for the South West from Monday as the UK is set to experience the tail end of a category three hurricane.

Hurricane Ophelia will be a storm when it hits the country, but the South West could still see some very high winds.

The Met Office's yellow weather warning means that severe weather is possible, and people should be prepared for possible disruption.

The warning is currently in place for between 12:00 and 23:55 on Monday 16 October. Credit: The Met Office

A spell of very windy weather is likely on Monday in association with ex-Ophelia.

Road, rail, air and ferry services may be affected, with longer journeys times and cancellations possible. Power cuts may occur, with the potential to affect other services, such as mobile phone coverage. Some damage to buildings, such as tiles blown from roofs could happen, perhaps leading to injuries and danger to life from flying debris.

– Met Office

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Met Office releases 2017/18 storm names

The Met Office has announced the list of UK storm names for 2017/18.

The national weather service uses a new naming list each season.

An annual campaign has been run since September 2015, called 'Name Our Storms', asking the public to send in suggestions.

The most popular ideas are combined with a list provided by Met Éireann in Ireland to create the final list.

The storm names for 2017/18 are:

The list omits the letters Q, U, X,Y and Z. Credit: Met Office

Amazing waterspout spotted at Weymouth Bay

An amazing waterspout was seen sweeping across Weymouth Bay earlier this morning.

Abigail Elizabeth Vincent managed to catch the event on her phone.

What exactly is a waterspout?

The Met Office says, "Tornadoes form when the weather is ‘unstable’ and showery. They are narrow, spinning columns of air that reach the ground from cumulonimbus (thunderstorm) clouds."

"As they develop we often see funnel shaped clouds extending from the base of the cloud and it is only when these funnel clouds touch the ground that we get a tornado. If the funnel cloud touches down at sea we get a waterspout."

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Huge thunderstorm hits the South West coast

Lightning strikes over Laira, Plymouth. Credit: Rachael Jackson

Thunder storms forming off the South West coast have hit towns and cities across Devon and Cornwall.

Paul McDonnell captured this footage in Plymouth this afternoon.

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A severe weather warning comes into force from 4pm this afternoon.

This live lightning map shows where any bolt of lightning is detected. Credit: lightningmaps.org
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