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  1. ITV Report

'Dad, I'm plummeting' - Becky Watts' family say they've no respite from grief

The family of murdered teenager Becky Watts have told ITV News that they don't think they will ever come to terms with what has happened.

The 16-year-old was killed by her stepbrother Nathan Matthews after he hatched a sexually-motivated kidnap plot with his girlfriend Shauna Hoare.

All offenders have now been sentenced in relation to the death of the teenager. Credit: Family

Today, her family say they are struggling to cope in the aftermath of the trial, and feel they have "no respite".

As the judicial process comes to an end, they feel they are finally experiencing the full weight of their grief.

Becky's grandfather John Galsworthy speaking at the end of the trial. Credit: ITV News

Just as we are beginning to adjust as much as one possibly can, we have another thing to face.

Darren [Becky's dad] is in a dreadful state because he is now trying to grieve, he rang me up a couple of weeks ago and said 'Dad I'm plummeting', and I realised that he is now grieving."

– John Galsworthy, grandfather

"He has been buoyed up, so to speak, by his family, and all the situation which has gone on here, but now he's beginning to feel the grief and I think we are too."

Mr Galsworthy's words come as the final sentences in relation to Becky's death have been handed out.

After Nathan Matthews dismembered Becky's body, the parts were hidden by Karl Demetrius and his girlfriend Jaydene Parsons in exchange for £10,000. They had "no idea" what they were hiding.

The couple have today been given jail sentences after admitting to assisting an offender - which her family say is some consolation.

Karl Demetrius and his girlfriend Jaydene Parsons were sentenced to two years and 16 months respectivly Credit: ITV News

John Galsworthy said "I don't suppose we will ever, ever be satisfied because of the depths of our grief and the loss of our granddaughter, but the law is the law and we have to reluctantly accept that that's what been dispensed as a - not not necessarily acceptable - sentence and go along with it."

"Whether we feel that that is insufficient to compensate, or if that's even a word we can use, I don't know."

"I have to accept the fact that's the law of the land, and whether we agree with it or no, or whether we think justice has been done or no, we have to accept that fact."

You can imagine the feelings of our family but we can't do anything about it."

– John Galsworthy, grandfather