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  1. ITV Report

Recognising diversity - looking ahead at Bristol's 2018 awards

Just some of the people whose achievements are being celebrated at the Bristol Diversity Awards. Credit: ITV West Country

From adaptive martial arts to support for people with HIV, the achievements of people from Bristol's disabled, ethnic minority and LGBT+ communities will be celebrated at the second Bristol Diversity Awards on Saturday 19 May.

  • Video report by Caron Bell

Here is a snapshot of some of those being recognised.

Gina Hopkins is nominated for the Positive Role Model Award for Disability. Credit: ITV West Country

Gina Hopkins has dystonia - a neurological muscle disorder. But she found martial arts so helpful that she and husband Chris set up a club especially for disabled people. An effort that's seen Gina nominated for the Positive Role Model Award for Disability.

I am absolutely honoured. It means a lot for me personally and for Adaptive Martial Arts. I haven't been able to work. I can still give back to the community, create employment through adaptive martial arts, and that has been the best thing in my life to date.

– Gina Hopkins
Chris and Gina Hopkins with some of the Adaptive Martial Arts group. Credit: Chris Hopkins

Gina and her husband Chris run the Adaptive Martial Arts group which works with adults and children in Bristol and Bath. It's been nominated in the organisation category of the Bristol Diversity Awards.

Dr Zainab Khan is up for a Positive Role Model Award for race and ethnicity. Credit: ITV West Country

Dr Zainab Khan is also up for a Positive Role Model Award - this time in the Race and Ethnicity Category. Based at the University of the West of England, Zainab is the curator of Equity, a new programme of coaching and workshops for black, Asian and minority ethnic students, to improve graduate outcomes.

I was delighted. It's been a really fantastic time for us here at UWE in terms of the work we've been doing on race equality. And to get that nomination at the end of the year is really special.

– Dr Zainab Khan
Polly Theedom says people in Bristol who are living with HIV still face discrimination. Credit: ITV West Country

Bristol's HIV support charity Brigstowe is up for an LGBT Organisation award. Its staff say that Bristol's 1,000-strong HIV community still face discrimination.

With things like that you have your money being affected, your housing. We see people experiencing discrimination in the workplace. And people need support. It can still be quite challenging in a lot of ways.

– Polly Theedom, Campaigns & Fundraising Manager, Brigstowe
Roy Hackett has won The Paul Stephenson Award for Contribution to Race Equality. Credit: ITV West Country

89-year-old civil rights campaigner Roy Hackett will be presented with an award for race equality. He was involved in the Bristol Bus boycott of 1963, which was called when the Bristol Bus Company refused to employ black drivers and conductors.

He went on to co-found the St Paul's Carnival. He says he's inspired by campaigners who went before him.

I always said, it's for me who inherited it. But it's a great deal of people who brought me to inherit this. And that's a fact. I don't do it on my own. And I wouldn't turn round and say 'me me me'. No. It's not me, it's we. Because they helped me a great deal.

– Roy Hackett
Protesters during the Bristol Bus Boycott in 1963. Credit: ITV West Country