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Brian May to visit "Camp Badger" in Somerset

Queen guitarist Brian May during a Wounded Badger Patrol in 2013 Credit: PA

One of leading opponents of the badger cull is in Somerset today.

Queen guitarist Brian May has campaigned extensively against the cull and he'll be visiting Camp Badger, which has been set up by anti-cull protesters near Williton in Somerset.

West Somerset is one of the locations for the trial cull, with West Gloucestershire, which he visited yesterday.

Brian May to visit Somerset to protest against badger cull

Brian May will visit Somerset today Credit: ITV News

One of leading opponents of the badger cull is in Somerset today.

Brian May has campaigned extensively against the cull and he'll be visiting Camp Badger, which has been set up by anti-cull protestors near Williton in Somerset.

West Somerset is one of the locations for the cull.

Rocks play music controlled by the weather

You might think that rocks playing music that's controlled by the weather sounds strange. And it is according to those on Portland who've been experiencing it this week.

They also say it's very beautiful and thought provoking. It's one of a series of art installations around the island.

Our Dorset Correspondent Duncan Sleightholme reports:

Sale of historic engine house is delayed

Prince of Wales Engine House near Tintagel Credit: ITV News West Country

A decision to delay the sale of an historic engine house near Tintagel has been welcomed by North Cornwall MP Dan Rogerson.

The site in the Trebarwith valley is owned by the Duchy of Cornwall. It includes the engine house and land at the Prince of Wales and Trewarmett quarries. It had been due for sale by auction on 18th September. Following requests from local residents it will be delayed until November.

“Of course it is up to the Duchy to manage their land and assets, but given the interest in this site and of the engine house to local people I am delighted that they have agreed to a short pause in the sale of the land. I have spoken with the Duchy of Cornwall and will now be contacting local residents who have raised their concerns with me, so that we can use this pause to discuss any ideas the local community and the Prince of Wales Engine House Society have for the future of the site.”

– Dan Rogerson MP for North Cornwall

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Rocks play music controlled by weather on Portland

People on Portland are being entertained and intrigued by a series of art installations. At the Bill, a computer is translating weather into music. Speakers hidden among the rocks play different sounds according to the conditions. It's part of the B-Side festival.

You can hear a snippet of the musical rocks below:

The fight to save a rare flower from extinction

Help is at hand to save the Deptford Pink from extinction in the West Country Credit: Species Recovery Trust

A flower that is close to extinction could be saved with the help of a grant of almost £10,000.

The Deptford Pink has recently disappeared from Dorset and Somerset, partly due to a loss of open scrubland. The Species Recovery Trust will use the money from the Sita trust to bring back its habitat at five sites, including Devon and Cornwall.

The flower needs open scrubland to thrive Credit: Species Recovery Trust

UK's biggest coastal realignment scheme completed in Somerset

Pathways and bridleways have been created so that people can enjoy the landscape Credit: ITV West Country/Kevin Langdon

The UK’s biggest ever coastal realignment scheme at Steart peninsula, a joint project between the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust and the Environment Agency has been completed today.

The WWT Steart Marshes scheme uses the shallow gradient and coarse vegetation of saltmarsh to naturally absorb wave energy. This will help to protect local villages from storm surges, and protect sea walls from erosion so that they last longer.

Half a million cubic metres of soil were dug and moved to create new and improved flood banks Credit: ITV West Country/Kevin Langdon

We need to be brave and bold if we are going to deal with the impacts of climate change. WWT Steart Marshes proves you can protect homes and businesses by using wetland technology that works with nature, not against it.

Climate change is here now. Last winter was the wettest on record and we suffered the worst storms for 20 years. I want to give full credit to the villagers of the Steart Peninsula for getting behind this idea, helping to shape it and helping to save the peninsula from being lost to rising sea levels.

– WWT Chief Executive Martin Spray
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