Live updates

Plymouth billionaire to give prisoners a pep talk

Plymouth's first home-gown billionaire is going to prison today, but just as a guest.

The founder of the Range chain of discount stores, Chris Dawson, will be in Dartmoor today. He is giving prisoners a pep talk on how to make an honest living.

His chain of a hundred stores and other enterprises are said to have earned him more than £1.2 billion but can still be seen working at weekends in his first store in Plymouth.

Dartmoor Prison. Credit: PA

£2 billion funding for West's roads due to be announced

Two billion pounds' worth of new road schemes for the region are due to be announced on Monday, ITV News West Country understands.

These are likely to include a tunnel at Stonehenge and making the A358 into dual carriageway - something Yeovil MP David Laws has been campaigning for.

"It's totally unacceptable that we've got a road that is so congested for large parts of the year. That's very inconvenient for people in my constituency who travel around parts of Somerset, it's certainly very inconvenient for people who want to travel across the region. It's absurd that when we're investing so much in other parts of the country that the South West has had to wait for so long."

– David Laws MP, Lib Dem, Yeovil
David Laws MP. Credit: PA


20 years of the National Lottery

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the National Lottery, which sees around eight jackpot winners in the West Country every year.

But for Plymouth's Mike Antonucci, his £2.8 million win back in 1995 did not set him up for life. Instead he spent it all on fast cars, yachts and luxury holidays.

Mike Antonucci won £2.8 million in 1995 Credit: ITV News

"Well it probably lasted 14 years, yeah 14, 15 years. I mean do you want to take the money with you, do you want to be the richest man in the graveyard? I don't know, you know."

– Mike Antonucci, Lottery winner


Bankrupt James auctions football memorabilia

David James declared himself bankrupt in May Credit: Chris Ison/PA

Former England footballer David James will auction off football memorabilia today after falling into financial difficulties.

The goalkeeper, who lived on Dartmoor, declared himself bankrupt in May, despite earning an estimated £20 million during his football career. He will hold an online auction of hundreds of items of football memorabilia to help pay off his debts.

Christmas money worries for 1 in 4

More than a quarter of people in our region are worried about how they will afford Christmas this year, according to a new survey.

The Money Advice Service says almost a third of us will turn to credit cards to help fund our celebrations, while 1 in 25 will take out a payday loan.

It is urging shoppers to plan their festive spending carefully, including making a budget, comparing online and high street shops and looking for special offers.

Christmas shoppers should spend wisely Credit: Barry Batchelor/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Flood victims face five-fold rise in insurance

Thousands of flood victims across our region are facing spiralling insurance premiums this winter - while others can't get any insurance at all.

That's despite more assurances from David Cameron in the aftermath of the winter storms that hit Devon and Cornwall - and months of flooding on the Somerset Levels.

But some are now facing a fivefold increase in their premiums - or are facing winter without any cover. Here's David Woodland.

Moorland villagers face home insurance battle

A fifth of the 126 flood victims at Moorland on the Somerset Levels haven't been able to get buildings insurance this year. Others have seen huge hikes in premiums even if they didn't flood.

The swollen River Parrett runs next to Rebecca Horsington's Farmhouse but it has never flooded the house, as it overflows in the other direction.

Despite that she was told her insurance would rise from £425 to £3500.

Moorland at the height of last winter's floods. Credit: PA

It makes a nonsense of what has happened here because we have had the dredge happen, we've had flood defences put in, so really our flood risk is a lot lower than it was before the floods hit and therefore the insurance premiums should be reflecting that.

– Rebecca Horsington
Load more updates