Police fight 'forced' retirement

Devon and Cornwall Police Federation is taking the police force to a tribunal today to challenge the 'compulsory' retirement of 136 officers after they had completed 30 years' service. The force is one of five being sued.

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FULL REPORT: Police 'forced' retirement fight

The Chief Constable of Devon and Cornwall told a tribunal today that the enforced retirement of hundreds of experienced officers was not just about saving money.

Shaun Sawyer was giving evidence in a test case over whether forcing people to leave after 30 years' service amounted to age discrimination.

The outcome could have far-reaching consequences for other police forces. From London, Bob Constantine reports.

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Interview with police fighting 'forced' retirement

Nigel Rabbitts from the Devon and Cornwall Police Federation explains in full why Devon and Cornwall Police are being taken to a tribunal today. 136 former officers say they have been 'forced' to retire early as part of a budget-cutting policy.

Devon and Cornwall is one of five forces being sued by former employees. Today's tribunal in London will look at three test cases.

Police at tribunal to challenge 'forced' retirement

Devon and Cornwall Police Federation is going to an industrial tribunal today to challenge the force's policy of compulsory retirement after 30 years' service. The force is one of five being sued.

In total 136 Devon and Cornwall officers have so far retired under the arrangement, some of them well below the national retirement age. They are given a full pension on leaving the force. They claim the policy is unfair, and driven by a need to cut the force's budget.

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