GCSE grades fall for second year

The proportion of GCSEs awarded at least a C grade has fallen for the second year running, official figures have revealed.

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Six sets of twins at same school notch up 43 A* grades

An impressive 43 A* and 44 A grades have been notched up by six sets of twins who attend the same school.

Minnie and Tallulah Crawley, Florence and Dorothy Hislop, George and Sam Price and Marcus and Charlotte Hook. Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Wire

The siblings are all in the same year group at St Mary Redcliffe and Temple School in Bristol, where results shot up by six per cent.

Dorothy and Florence Hislop, 16, scored 13 A*, six As and one B between them.

Two sets of twins (left to right) Minnie Crawley, Tallulah Crawley, Florence Hislop and Dorothy Hislop. Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Wire

Dorothy, who gained seven A*s, two As and one B, said: "We were so nervous, everyone kept saying the grades were slipping, so today was a surprise. I am really happy with my results."



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GCSE grades drop in English, maths and science

GCSE grades have fallen for a second consecutive year, with a drop in the proportion of entries scoring at least a C in English, maths and science.

  • In English, 63.6% of entries gained a C or higher, down from 64.1% last summer.
  • In maths, 57.6% of entries scored an A*-C grade, compared to 58.4% in 2012.
  • In Science, there has been a 7.6% fall in the proportion of entries awarded a C grade or higher.

The drop in English comes amid a rise in the number of younger students taking the GCSE exams, the Joint Council for Qualifications said.

The fall in Science follows a move by Ofqual to toughen up the qualifications after a 2009 report by the regulator found that the courses were too easy.

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Exam boards question rise in 15-year-olds taking GCSEs

Exam boards have criticised the rise in the number of 15-year-olds taking GCSE exams, with 91,000 children sitting the tests a year early.

Why oh why do we now get a significant increase in 15-year-olds taking GCSE?

– Andrew Hall of the exam board AQA

Early entry does not benefit the students. The results are far lower for 15-year-olds - these qualifications are designed for 16-year-olds.

Students should be left to learn for those two years and that is what we would encourage.

– Mark Dawe of the exam board OCR
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