Somerset flood pumps turned off after riverbank damage

Work is being carried out to stop river bank damage caused by giant pumps used to help reduce flooding on the Somerset Levels.

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Flood pumps switch-on delayed by high water levels

The Dutch pumps at Beer Wall. Credit: ITV News/David Woodland

Plans to switch on extra pumps to try and clear the Somerset Levels of floodwater have been delayed. The machinery, which is in place at Beer Wall, had been expected to begin operating this morning if water levels dropped enough.

Environment Agency staff opened sluice gates at Monks Leaze yesterday, which is sending water downstream to the Beer Wall area. The Beer Wall pumps cannot be turned on until that water level has dropped.

  1. West Country (E)

Work to get pumps back on continues

Giant pumps being used to help reduce flooding on the Somerset Levels have been turned off because they are damaging the river banks.

The Environment Agency took the action yesterday so they could stabilise the ground. Steel shipping containers are now going to be used to help secure the damaged area - and the pump pipe work will be moved upstream.

Bob Cruwys reports on the latest setback adding to the misery for people living on the Levels:-

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  1. West Country (E)

Plans continues to get pumping re-started

Giant pumps being used to help reduce flooding on the Somerset Levels following damage to the river banks are still out of action.

The Environment Agency turned the pumps off yesterday so they could stabilise the ground. The 13 pumps have been in operation since Thursday.

Steel shipping containers will now be used to help stabilise the damaged area and the pump pipe work will be moved upstream.

Engineers are working on a plan to get pumping started again, after the giant machines damaged river banks. Credit: ITV News West Country

Somerset flood pumps switched off

Giant pumps being used to help reduce flooding on the Somerset Levels have been switched off because they were damaging a riverbank.

The 13 pumps, which have been imported from the Netherlands, are diverting flood water in an effort to reduce river levels.

But the Environment Agency noticed that serious damage was being done to the banks of the River Parrett and took the decision to turn the pumps off and assess the situation.

The decision was taken to stop for a short period to stabilise the bank so we can restart pumping on Monday. We also have used this opportunity to move the pipes further into the estuary to minimise further damage.

– Environment Agency Spokesman

Today's dry weather means that water levels have dropped slightly, but more rain is forecast next week.

When fully operational the pumps can move more than 7 million tonnes of water per day.

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