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Union leader calls for nuclear power talks

The leader of the union representing 21,000 workers in the nuclear decommissioning and energy supply industry has called on all parties involved in negotiations to redouble their efforts to reach agreement on a strike price for electricity generated by the planned Hinkley Point C in Somerset.

Alan Leighton, the National Secretary of Prospect, made his comments following today's announcement from EDF that it plans to scale back on preparatory work for the project and reduce the number of people working on it in a bid to control costs.

"Our members' fear that any delay in the preparation work could impede or delay EDF's ability to bring the project to fruition once agreement has been reached.Prospect is committed to an appropriate energy mix for the UK, including gas and renewables, but it is undoubtedly the case that nuclear and nuclear new build will be pivotal if we are to achieve the twin goals of capacity and security of supply.

We hope that this announcement will encourage all involved in the talks to redouble their efforts to agree a strike price. Particularly as it comes so soon after the recent warning from outgoing Ofgem head, Alistair Buchanan, that we are facing an imminent capacity crunch in the UK unless urgent action is taken.Without an agreement we risk losing a once-in-a-generation opportunity to meet the country's decarbonisation targets and help build a new economy that provides good quality jobs and growth for the UK."

– Alan Leighton, National Secretary, Prospect Union

Superfast broadband for Isles of Scilly

by Steve Hardy
Engineers laying superfast broadband cables in Cornwall. Credit: ITV News West Country

An ambitious scheme to provide superfast Broadband for the Isles of Scilly has been unveiled by BT.

It's expected that the first customers will be connected during the first half of 2014.

A cable ship is due to spend about a month later this year cutting and moving two cables, which had previously been used for communications between the UK and Ireland and Spain, and connecting them to the islands.

It's expected to cost more than three million pounds and will provide the islanders with some of the fastest internet connections in the country.

Contest to design the next hit mobile app in Exeter

Could the next Angry Birds game be developed this weekend in Exeter?

Teams from universities throughout the West Country are taking part in a contest this weekend to create a new app for your mobile phone or tablet.

It's part of a worldwide challenge to find the next great use for mobile technology.

Richard Lawrence has been at Exeter University:

Eyeball push marks hospital move

The inflatable eyeball will be pushed four miles Credit: Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust

Staff from Plymouth's Royal Eye Infirmary will this afternoon mark their move to new facilities at Derriford Hospital by pushing a giant inflatable eyeball between the two locations. Around 20 NHS workers are expected to take part in the event, starting at 2pm from Apsley Road.

The team will then travel up Mannamead road, crossing under Manadon roundabout to Tavistock road, up to Crownhill before heading into the hospital site from Derriford Road. They hope to finish around 4.30pm

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Plymouth's Royal Eye Infirmary moving sites after 112 years

by Jacquie Bird

One of Plymouth's oldest institutions is about to relocate, ending more than a century of history. The city's 112 year-old Royal Eye Infirmary is moving from the city centre to a new purpose-built suite with operating theatres and consulting rooms at Derriford Hospital.

Five million pounds has been spent on the development, which has been planned for decades.

Plymouth's eye hospital to move

Treatment at Royal Eye Infirmary Credit: Itv News West Country

One of Plymouth's oldest institutions is about to move. The city's 112 year old Royal Eye Infirmary is transferring from its old building in the city centre to a new purpose built suite of operating theatres and consulting rooms at Derriford Hospital.

Five million pounds has been spent on the new development, which has been planned for decades.

The REI was opened back in 1901, with royal approval from King Edward VII. At the time it was thought to be cutting edge, but it's now far from ideal as a modern hospital.

It's built on three floors and at its heart is a winding staircase. All the departments are in different places making them really difficult to get to.

The replacement suite at Derriford will be filled with state of the art equipment for laser eye surgery and some of the intricate procedures carried out by the ophthalmic consultants. it will still be called the Royal Eye Infirmary.

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