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Academy's 'best ever' for first choice university

City Academy in St George has told ITV News West Country 95% of Sixth Form students received their first choice of university this year.

The former St George Secondary School was one of ex Prime Minister Tony Blair's first Academies and will celebrate its tenth anniversary in September.

It is also the oldest Academy in the whole of the South West of England.

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  1. National

A-level subject gender gap 'worrying'

A teaching leader said he was "worried" about the huge variance in subjects chosen by girls and boys in their A-levels.

Brian Lightman, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said teachers should challenge stereotypical views:

We need, as teachers, to try and raise awareness of these stereotypical views that occur.

But it's a societal thing as well; in wider society we need to try and break those stereotypical models. We need to show role models of people who are doing different things.

– Brian Lightman
  1. National

A-level subject choice gender gap 'widens'

The latest A-level results showed there were huge gender differences in pupils' choices in subject, with officials saying the gap has "extenuated" this year.

Girls were more likely to take subjects such as English Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

For instance, girls accounted for more than seven in 10 entries for English exams, while four in every five physics exam entries were for boys.

  1. National

Top A-level grades fall again

The proportion of A-levels awarded at least an A grade has fallen for the second year in a row, official figures showed today.

In total, 26.3 percent of entries scored an A or A* this year, down from 26.6 percent in 2012 - a drop of 0.3 percent. It is believed to be the second biggest fall in the history of A-levels.

More than a quarter of grades were still either A or A* Credit: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire

The A*-A pass rate fell for the first time in more than 20 years last year.

The latest drop comes amid rising numbers of teenagers taking A-levels in science and maths.

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