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"Not the end" says former MP after Camelford apology

The Health Minister Anna Soubry and Environment Minister Richard Benyon have apologised on behalf of The Government to all those affected in the Camelford water poisoning incident 25 years ago.

20 tonnes of aluminium sulphate was accidentally dumped in the wrong tank at the old South West Water Authority works at Lowermoor in 1988.

Lord Tyler, a former North Cornwall MP, says this is not the end of the story:

Apology from Government for Camelford poisoning

The Health Minister Anna Soubry and the Environment Minister Richard Benyon have apologised on behalf of government to all those affected in the Camelford water poisoning incident 25 years ago.

20 tonnes of aluminium sulphate was accidentally dumped in the wrong tank at the old South West Water Authority works at Lowermoor in 1988.

North Cornwall's MP Dan Rogerson had called several meetings with the Ministers to secure the official apology.

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Calls for investigation into Camelford water pollution

Drinking water had to be brought into the town after the pollution incident in 1988. Credit: ITV News archive

There are calls for a Parliamentary watchdog to investigate the alleged cover-up of the Camelford water pollution incident twenty five years ago.

Campaigners say the only way to find out what really happened in the days after the incident in July 1988 is for a full investigation by the Commons Health Select Committee.

Water to homes and businesses in north Cornwall was contaminated after 20 tonnes of highly toxic aluminium sulphate was accidentally dumped into the supply.

Questions 'still remain unanswered' says MP

A panel has concluded that it's unlikely anyone suffered any harm as a result of the Camelford water poisoning incident.

20 tonnes of aluminium sulphate was accidentally dumped in the wrong tank at the old South West Water Authority works at Lowermoor in 1988.

A panel of experts said it is unlikely to have done long term damage to peoples' health.

Dan Rogerson, the MP for North Cornwall, says questions 'still remain unanswered':

Camelford report says further work is needed

The subgroup, who have released a new report into the Camelford incident say further work is needed to look at the health of children born to women who were pregnant at the time of the pollution.

It happened in 1988 when 20 tons of aluminium sulphate was dumped into the wrong tank at a water treatment works at Lowermoor.It went directly into the local water supply.

Last year an inquest into local resident Carole Cross revealed high levels of aluminium found in her brain.

She died from a rare form of alzheimers and her family believe the water pollution led to her death. A coroner at her inquest said it was possible but there wasn't enough evidence to say so conclusively.

This latest report said they did not find a conclusive link.

Our research indicates that it is unlikely that the relatively short term exposure to chemicals from this incident would have caused long term health effects among local people. However, work on potential long term neurological effects is needed because of problems with the design of previous studies and to follow up an unusual case of dementia in an individual who lived in the Lowermoor water supply area at the time of the incident.

– Professor Frank Woods, Chairman of the Subgroup

New report published on Camelford water pollution

New report published into Camelford water pollution incident Credit: ITV News West Country

A new report claims it is unlikely the water pollution incident that happened at Camelford in 1988 would have caused long term harm to the health of local people.

The report by the Lowermoor Subgroup of the Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment (COT) says the short period of increased exposure to the chemicals involved in the incident was unlikely to cause "delayed or persistent harm."

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Missing woman found near Camelford

A large scale search for missing person Joy Grigg came to a safe conclusion on Thursday evening, , when she was found at around 9.15pm near Camelford in Cornwall.

The search had been taking place across the Launceston area throughout Thursday involving Police, search and rescue and local people.

said: "There was a great amount of support offered by volunteer agencies and the public in the search for Joy.

"I'd like to particularly thank farmers in the area who took the time to search their land as part of the effort.

"We're thankful the search was brought to a safe conclusion and that was in no small part due to the support of local people."

– Chief Inspector Shaun Kenneally

Community to take over Camelford Leisure Centre

The pool at Camelford leisure centre, which was under threat of closure Credit: ITV Westcountry

Final plans are being made for the local community to take over the running of Camelford Leisure Centre. It was under threat after Cornwall Council said it wanted to offload it as part of council-wide cost cutting measures. Residents will now take over the centre at the end of the year.

New bards to be welcomed at Cornish Gorsedd

The annual meeting of the Cornish Gorsedd takes place today in Camelford. 14 new bards will be welcomed including Lady Mary Holborow, the former Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall and Ken Cocks, an expert on Cornish wrestling.

Cornish Gorsedd Credit: ITV Westcountry

The Gorsedd is a ceremony which dates back more than eighty years. It celebrates Cornwall's culture and language, some of which had been lost in the mists of time. Members of the Gorsedd are called Bards and include people who have worked effectively in any way for Cornwall.