Live updates

Police appeal for witnesses after fatal crash

Police are appealing for witnesses after a crash on the B3266, at Washaway, Bodmin yesterday (Dec 26) evening.

A vehicle was travelling towards Bodmin when it was involved in a head-on collision with a vehicle travelling towards Camelford.

The driver of the Bodmin- bound vehicle, a 29 year old local man was taken to Treliske Hospital with serious injuries. The four occupants of the second vehicle, were taken to Derriford Hospital with serious injuries, one of which, a 26 year old female died whilst en route.

Advertisement

Explosion at a house in Cornwall

Explosion at a house in Cornwall Credit: Devon and Cornwall Police

One person is in hospital after an explosion at a house in Cornwall.

Emergency services were called to a property on Trecalgo View in Camelford late last night. The home was badly damaged and near by cars were also damaged by flying debris.

A corden is in place for the clean up operation and police are investigating what caused it. There's thought to be no further risk of explosion.

The sole occupant is recovering in Royal Cornwall Hospital and believed to be in a stable condition.

Explosion at a house in Cornwall Credit: Devon and Cornwall Police

"Not the end" says former MP after Camelford apology

The Health Minister Anna Soubry and Environment Minister Richard Benyon have apologised on behalf of The Government to all those affected in the Camelford water poisoning incident 25 years ago.

20 tonnes of aluminium sulphate was accidentally dumped in the wrong tank at the old South West Water Authority works at Lowermoor in 1988.

Lord Tyler, a former North Cornwall MP, says this is not the end of the story:

Apology from Government for Camelford poisoning

The Health Minister Anna Soubry and the Environment Minister Richard Benyon have apologised on behalf of government to all those affected in the Camelford water poisoning incident 25 years ago.

20 tonnes of aluminium sulphate was accidentally dumped in the wrong tank at the old South West Water Authority works at Lowermoor in 1988.

North Cornwall's MP Dan Rogerson had called several meetings with the Ministers to secure the official apology.

Advertisement

Calls for investigation into Camelford water pollution

Drinking water had to be brought into the town after the pollution incident in 1988. Credit: ITV News archive

There are calls for a Parliamentary watchdog to investigate the alleged cover-up of the Camelford water pollution incident twenty five years ago.

Campaigners say the only way to find out what really happened in the days after the incident in July 1988 is for a full investigation by the Commons Health Select Committee.

Water to homes and businesses in north Cornwall was contaminated after 20 tonnes of highly toxic aluminium sulphate was accidentally dumped into the supply.

Questions 'still remain unanswered' says MP

A panel has concluded that it's unlikely anyone suffered any harm as a result of the Camelford water poisoning incident.

20 tonnes of aluminium sulphate was accidentally dumped in the wrong tank at the old South West Water Authority works at Lowermoor in 1988.

A panel of experts said it is unlikely to have done long term damage to peoples' health.

Dan Rogerson, the MP for North Cornwall, says questions 'still remain unanswered':

Camelford report says further work is needed

The subgroup, who have released a new report into the Camelford incident say further work is needed to look at the health of children born to women who were pregnant at the time of the pollution.

It happened in 1988 when 20 tons of aluminium sulphate was dumped into the wrong tank at a water treatment works at Lowermoor.It went directly into the local water supply.

Last year an inquest into local resident Carole Cross revealed high levels of aluminium found in her brain.

She died from a rare form of alzheimers and her family believe the water pollution led to her death. A coroner at her inquest said it was possible but there wasn't enough evidence to say so conclusively.

This latest report said they did not find a conclusive link.

Our research indicates that it is unlikely that the relatively short term exposure to chemicals from this incident would have caused long term health effects among local people. However, work on potential long term neurological effects is needed because of problems with the design of previous studies and to follow up an unusual case of dementia in an individual who lived in the Lowermoor water supply area at the time of the incident.

– Professor Frank Woods, Chairman of the Subgroup

New report published on Camelford water pollution

New report published into Camelford water pollution incident Credit: ITV News West Country

A new report claims it is unlikely the water pollution incident that happened at Camelford in 1988 would have caused long term harm to the health of local people.

The report by the Lowermoor Subgroup of the Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment (COT) says the short period of increased exposure to the chemicals involved in the incident was unlikely to cause "delayed or persistent harm."

Load more updates