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Grey seal 'Molar' makes a comeback off Dorset

Molar has reappeared off Portland after disappearing from Cornwall Credit: Sarah Hodgson

A grey seal who disappeared after being spotted in St Austell Bay in Cornwall two years ago has finally reappeared.

The female named 'Molar' was spotted at Portland Bill in Dorset this week. Distinctive markings on her neck make her easily identifiable.

She's the first seal to be photo ID'd in both Cornwall and Dorset. Recording seal movements enables conservationists to learn more about how far and frequently they travel and how best to protect them.

Two years ago, when I photographed Molar, I was sure she’d be recognised again, but then she disappeared for two years. Now I am delighted to see her again and for her to be our first Cornwall to Dorset seal link.

Molar proves that our photo-identification project really works and is a fabulous, non-invasive way of monitoring the lives and movements of our seals.

– Rob Wells, Cornwall Seal Group Research Trust (CSGRT)

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Seal finds ideal sun trap on work crew's boat

The seal thought it had found the ideal suntrap on the River Tone Credit: Environment Agency SW

It seems the sunshine encouraged everyone to bathe in its glory today - including this seal.

The Pirate seal spotted the ideal spot to catch some rays after the Environment Agency parked its weeding boat nearby.

The crew had to "calmly persuade" the lounging mammal to jump off the vessel on the River Tone so they could continue with their work!

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Rare seal pup given permanent home in Cornwall

Badger the rare black seal pup Credit: Cornish Seal Sanctuary

A rare black seal pup abandoned by his mum when only two weeks old will need lifelong medical care.

Grey seal pup Badger was rescued from the Isles of Scilly last November with wounds thought to have been inflicted by other seals.

He has since been looked after at the Cornish Seal Sanctuary, where he has now been diagnosed with a permanent thyroid condition requiring regular medication.

Badger when he was a pup Credit: Cornish Seal Sanctuary

Without regular treatment Badger would die. He responded so well to antibiotics and other treatment when he first arrived, we were confident he would soon be resuming life in the wild.

Unfortunately his condition soon deteriorated again, and that was when it was discovered he has an under-active thyroid.

– Tamara Cooper, Cornish Seal Sanctuary

Badger is the only one of 62 seal pups rescued by the Sanctuary over the winter who has not since been released.

Happily, Badger now seems to have no problems socialising with the other residents who have given him a warm welcome.

We went to film Badger at the Sanctuary. He certainly knows his way around the water.

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