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Hundreds of police job losses feared in Devon and Cornwall

Credit: ITV West Country

There are fears that Devon and Cornwall Police could be about to announce hundreds more job losses.

Police and Crime Commissioner Tony Hogg and Chief Constable Shaun Sawyer are due to discuss the possibility of more job losses at a meeting in Plymouth tomorrow.

The force already has plans in place to cut 500 staff over the next five years.

Petition for fairer police funding delivered to Downing St

Credit: ITV News

A petition calling for Devon and Cornwall Police to get a fairer funding deal and prevent hundreds of jobs being lost in the force was handed in to Downing Street this afternoon.

Police and Crime Commissioner Tony Hogg joined MPs from the region to say that a planned change to the current formula would be disastrous for the South West.

Petition calling for fairer police funding to be handed into government

Tony Hogg says the standard of policing the public is used to would not be sustainable with the new funding plans Credit: ITV West Country

An 8,000 signature petition calling for fair funding for Devon and Cornwall Police is due to be handed in to 10 Downing Street later.

The Police and Crime Commissioner Tony Hogg, says changes in the way police funding is calculated will mean the force will lose 24 million pounds - the equivalent of 500 hundred police officers.

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Devon & Cornwall PCC: 'Simply unfair' lack of funds for policing

Tony Hogg says the standard of policing the public is used to would not be sustainable with the new funding plans. Credit: ITV West Country

Devon and Cornwall's Police and Crime Commissioner has written to the government to ask for fairer funding for his police force.

Tony Hogg says the force will lose a further £24 million under the government's funding policy.

He says it doesn't account for the increase in population in the summer months, and puts the police force at a disadvantage because it covers such a large area.

"Some of the policing that the public has come to terms with over decades in terms of neighbourhood policing, or roads policing, look like they would be unsustainable if we can't overturn these proposals from the government - which are simply unfair to Devon and Cornwall."

– Tony Hogg, Devon & Cornwall PCC

Why has PCC Tony Hogg decided not to stand again?

Tony Hogg is stepping down as PCC for Devon and Cornwall in May 2016 Credit: ITV News

The Police and Crime Commissioner for Devon and Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly has announced that he will not seek re-election next May.

Tony Hogg was elected in 2012, and says he is proud of his achievements in overseeing the force.

ITV News asked his office why Mr Hogg was stepping down. This is their response.

  • Having set up the role and made it a success, he feels it is a good time to move on
  • Staying on another term will take him over the age of 70
  • His job keeps him away most weekdays and he wants to spend more time with his family
  • He is not stepping down - he will still be in post until May, with a lot to achieve before then.

You can read more about Mr Hogg's plans here.

Devon & Cornwall's PCC 'not seeking re-election'

The Police and Crime Commissioner Tony Hogg on walkabout in Exmouth Credit: ITV News

Tony Hogg has announced that he will not seek re-election as Police and Crime Commissioner for Devon, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly next May. Mr Hogg, was elected in November 2012 and will step down in eight months' time.

I have three main priorities that will keep me working right up to the point that I handover to the next commissioner - improving police funding, effective community policing and the transformation of volunteering and the Special Constabulary.

– Tony Hogg

Earlier this month, Mr Hogg hit out at the "scandalous lack of funding" of Devon and Cornwall Police. He says he will continue his campaign before he retires.

My campaign to achieve fair funding for Devon and Cornwall Police in the annual policing grant forms a leading part of our plans to meet public sector savings targets.

– Tony Hogg

Police say responding to non-emergency calls can take time

Devon & Cornwall Police's non emergency phone service has been described as 'unacceptable' by the Police & Crime Commissioner.

According to a report from Tony Hogg, one in five callers are having to wait twenty minutes to be dealt with. He also described the technology used by the force as 'not fit for purpose'. The Police say they're having to make some difficult choices. Chief Inspector Jim Nye says responding to the calls can take time.

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