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The moment a blind man got his sight back

A woman from Devon has captured the moment a blind man's sight was restored, as part of a project in Malawi in Africa.

Rachel Palmer filmed the operation, which was broadcast live on the internet around the world. When the bandage was removed, the man was able to see his 18 month old grandson for the first time.

Watch what happened in the following video, courtesy of Sightsavers.

Medical ship prepares to leave Falmouth to fight Ebola

The RFA Argus is due to leave for Africa to tackle the ebola crisis Credit: PA

The RFA Argus is preparing to leave Falmouth for Sierra Leone where it will help in the battle against the spread of the Ebola virus.

It will transport 750 servicemen and women and three Merlin helicopters to help support training and treatment centres.

It will also be equipped with 100 beds including a critical care unit.

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Devon journalist films blind man's sight restored

Winesi, who was blind, got to see his grandson for the first time Credit: SeeTheMiracle

A woman from Devon has captured the moment a blind man's sight was restored, as part of a project in Malawi in Africa. Rachel Palmer filmed the operation, which was broadcast live on the internet around the world. When the bandage was removed, the man was able to see his 18 month old grandson for the first time.

It was absolutely incredible. One of the most amazing things I've seen. Being able to give someone back their sight also means giving back their life and it was just remarkable, the difference in this one guy, Winesi, who we followed. He had a whole new lease of life and he actually said "before when I was blind, I felt like I was dead and I feel like I've been reborn now."

– Rachel Palmer, Multimedia journalist

Cornish troops head to Africa to help with Ebola outbreak

Medical exercises have been taking place before Army medics are sent to Sierra Leone Credit: Anna Gowthorpe/PA Wire

More than 750 military personnel are being sent to West Africa to help in the efforts to contain the Ebola outbreak.

The announcement comes as the first Ebola patient to be diagnosed in the US, Thomas Eric Duncan, has died in hospital in Texas. The World Health Organisation has warned that sporadic cases in Europe are now "unavoidable."

It's understood RFA Argus will also be sent to Sierra Leone, along with three helicopters.

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Still no justice for Scarlett Keeling, six years after she was killed in Goa

Scarlett Keeling was killed in Goa six years ago Credit: ITV News

It's hard to believe that the trial of two men accused of causing the death of North Devon teenager Scarlett Keeling is still going more than four years after it began at Goa's Childrens Court. To make matters even worse for her mum, Fiona MacKeown, she's had no contact from the Indian authorities to let her know how the case is progressing and when it might end.

Fiona says: "I think it's ridiculously bizarre you know my daughter was murdered in their country. You'd think that they would have some kind of duty to inform about what's happening but they don't."

Fiona MacKeown says the family are still waiting for justice Credit: ITV News

The two local men are accused of drugging and assaulting Scarlett and a version of manslaughter for leaving her on the beach, where the authorities say she then drowned. It's not just a mother's grief that refuses to accept this version of events - Fiona says the evidence proves it was murder - but the Indian police have never identified the others believed to have been there the night Scarlett died.

"I don't think it's going to be a hundred per cent satisfactory because they still use the phrase left on the beach to die when that wasn't the case. She was held face down in the water forcibly, I've seen the bruises on her body and that would be the hundred per cent satisfactory outcome to find whoever did that to her, and see them go to prison for a long time. But the men that they've got have got some involvement so I don't know, I'll have to wait, waiting is what I've done."

The Childrens Court only sits a couple of times a month and has many cases on its books so trials run side by side over many years.

"It's appalling there's very little support from the countries that it happens in, they really don't seem to care much, they seem to care how it affects the tourist industry rather than the people themselves. All the people that I've spoken to that has had somebody murdered in Goa says the same thing. The hardest thing is the way that the country has treated us, it's hard enough to lose somebody but to be treated like that is appalling."

And so the wait goes on for Scarlett's family, justice as far away as ever

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