Press Centre

The Jonathan Ross Show

  • Episode: 

    11 of 11

  • Title: 

    2015
  • Transmission (TX): 

    Sat 04 Apr 2015
  • TX Confirmed: 

    Yes
  • Time: 

    9.35pm - 10.30pm
  • Week: 

    Week 15 2015 : Sat 04 Apr - Fri 10 Apr
  • Channel: 

    ITV
  • Status: 

    Last in series
KYLIE MINOGUE speaks about her return to good health, giving up on looking for love, and her relationship with Michael Hutchence. She also speaks about Madonna’s Brit Awards fall and whether she would return to Neighbours.  
 
CLARE BALDING speaks about her recent civil partnership, nudity, and how she maintains a youthful look.
 
BEAR GRYLLS speaks about becoming notorious for drinking his own urine, his children following in his footsteps, whether he’s thinking about retirement, and turning 40.
 
ETHAN HAWKE speaks about his experiences on the film Boyhood, working with Hollywood legend Robin Williams, and the pressures of fame.
 
This week’s The Jonathan Ross Show sees Jonathan joined by pop icon Kylie Minogue; survival expert Bear Grylls, TV presenter Clare Balding and Hollywood star Ethan Hawke.
 
Kylie reflects on her return to good health and reaching the pivotal ten year all clear mark:
 
“I’m good. I have yet to reach my ten year mark which I imagine I’ll be having a bit of champagne and crying a lot and feeling very happy and joyful and thanking all my friends and family. It’s quite difficult to talk about it in interview situations because it’s deep, and it’s long and it’s involved and it’s hard to really say what it was in a neat package. It’s pretty strange.”
 
When asked about Angelina Jolie recently publicly discussing removing her ovaries, and whether she identifies with her, Kylie remarks: “To a point, I mean cancer has many forms. I guess, I can only say to a point I did because I don’t really know her story, she doesn’t really know my story. Cancer has probably touched everyone in this audience in some way or another and all the stories are different but certainly in as much as she felt it was her duty to talk about it. I never questioned, not for a split second did I think of not saying what I had.”
 
Kylie also discusses being single again and whether she’s any closer to find a Mr Right:
 
“Maybe I’m not looking anymore, I figure if someone’s there they can come and find me. It’s not that I don’t have my eyes open, I meet a lot of incredible, charismatic amazing wonderful people but with everyone to try and find the right person, it’s just, it’s not easy, is it people? All I do is work so I’ll probably meet someone on the job.”
 
As she prepares for her latest concert in Hyde Park, Kylie admits she ‘felt for’ Madonna after watching her spectacular fall at this year’s BRIT Awards, and speaks of the perils of live performance:
 
“There’s always perils. Between the wardrobe and stage and quick changes, just a zillion things that could go wrong, so you’re always kind of negotiating and when something does go wrong, try and cover it up. Madonna couldn’t really cover that one up. But I felt for her because I’ve landed on my backside a couple of times.”
 
Kylie then looks back on her relationship with Michael Hutchence, having dedicated a song to him on her recent tour:
 
“He was like my guardian angel for that tour, definitely.”
 
When Jonathan asks whether Michael introduced her to a wilder side of life, she responds “Yeah...it was a great time. It was all sorts of things. It wasn’t just a great time. I was very sad when it finished. He had an enormous impact on my life.”
 
And when asked what the craziest thing they had done together was, she reveals “There’s no way I could tell you, just use your imagination.”
 
Reflecting upon the impact Hutchence had on her, she says:
 
 “I used to say it was like I had blinkers on and then the blinkers came off. Because it was the right time in my life as well to open up to the world and discover a lot of new things. Even when it was slightly on the wild side, he was always very tender with me. I was a little precious thing to him. Amongst the headiness, it was always very sweet.”
 
I think anyone who met him, he just had a lust for life. Really. And he introduced me to that. To kind of do everything a little bit more. It’s probably the most boring thing to say but just when we were dating, and I was just starting to learn about live performance and I probably wasn’t very good so I was just cutting my teeth, and because I wasn’t very confident, I would keep moving all the time. I remember him saying to me ‘it’s OK to be still sometimes. Just be OK in the stillness.’ And when I performed Need You Tonight on tour, I didn’t move from the microphone stand, which is kind of unusual to me.”
 
Almost 30 years after shooting to stardom in Neighbours, Kylie also speculates on whether she would ever reprise the role of Charlene Mitchell:
 
“I just like to say never say never about anything in life. But I don’t think it would have done Charlene any favours to come back now. You know what I mean – she exists there and she’s so strong and loved in people’s memories and for me as well, I don’t think I’d have done her any justice.”
 
When asked where she thinks Charlene would be today, she says “I don’t know. I’d like to think that she was so gutsy as a youngster and breaking the rules and being a tomboy. It would be cool if she had a few garages around Queensland. She was a little tycoon in the motoring world, that would be cool.”
 
Kylie also gives Jonathan an insight into life on the road, revealing what’s inside her tour bus:
 
“I did have a nice bus on this tour. It was quite fancy. Five of us, a few bunk beds and I had a nice double bed at the back. With disco lighting, it was cool.”
 
Clare Balding joins Jonathan to reveal the secret behind maintaining her youthful looks, after Kylie gushes “Clare looks amazing.”
 
“The answer to your question is probably walking. I walk like crazy. Pair of trainers, walk for miles, it’s great. I’ve walked probably, maybe 2,000 miles.”
 
Clare then reveals details about her recent civil partnership and speaks of how she considered it important for equality:
 
“We converted. So it was a civil partnership that we did in 2006, and then we actually went to the same registry office and they just backdate it to when you did your civil partnership, so officially now we have been married since 2006. We didn’t have a big party at all actually, nobody came apart from us, I’m quite keen on the whole idea of a party obviously, I don’t know the etiquette though, are you allowed to ask for presents again? It’s all about the party and the presents.”
 
“It’s about equality. It’s just about knowing that you can and knowing that you can say ‘I’m married’, and nobody’s going to think that’s married in inverted commas, no that’s actually married. I think it’s great.”
 
Clare gives her opinions on attitudes towards body image, explaining she struggles to embrace nudity:
 
“I’m bad with nudity, really bad. No absolutely not!”
 
When asked by Jonathan if she is OK in changing room, she responds “No I’m not really. I’m trying to get better.”
 
Claire also stresses she feels there is too much emphasis on female appearance:
 
“I want girls and women to feel fine about their bodies, it doesn’t matter what any of us look like and just get on with it. I do think there’s far too much attention on women and visual appearance. Most men don’t get judged so much, a little bit, on their visual appearance and are stronger for it. But women are all the time.”
 
Claire describes how an experience changing into waterproof trousers whilst on a radio rambling pursuit led to a fan telling it was the ‘most erotic radio’ they had ever heard.
 
“So I go into, we’re crossing the road, and there’s a little bus stop there and I said ‘I’ll just nip into the bus stop and I’ll change my trousers but I have to take them off because they’re soaking wet, and then put on waterproof trousers, but I was mucking about and I was describing it like I was commenting on some sports event, taking off the trousers and putting on the waterproof trousers, and she’s recording, and it stays in the programme, and then I got a letter from somebody saying it was the most erotic radio they’ve ever heard.”
 
As presenter of Crufts, Clare’s appearance prompts Jonathan to challenge Clare into guessing the cross breeds of four different dogs – as one of the dogs, Pepsi gets overly amorous with Kylie, Jonathan quips “we’ve all thought about doing that.”
 
Meanwhile, survival expert Bear Grylls speaks about finding fame for drinking his own urine:
 
“It’s over rated is what I know. It tastes terrible, warm, salty. I get a lot of people coming up to me on the rare occasion I’m in a bar and they go ‘pint or urine.’ It’s always a running gag. If someone had said to me aged seven that I’d become known around the world for drinking my own pee, I would have thought actually it’s quite fun.”
 
He also rules out retiring from his escapades any time soon:
 
“If I could be 60 and doing this great. At 40 I’m loving it, who knows what’s around the corner tomorrow, but doing my best. A lot of it’s about not getting injured – as long as I’m fit and healthy and I’m moving and I’m loving it, then I’ll carry on doing it.”
 
Discussing his latest series Mission Survive, Bear admits that the participating celebrities underestimated how tough the process would be:
 
“I did warn them and the producers said ‘this will be a genuine tough two week jungle journey, it’s going to be the most brutal thing you will ever do, and they were like ‘yeah great, we want it’. But I think people don’t really understand it until they’re in it. Day one or two when suddenly they realise actually there’s no catering off camera, nice place to stay, and actually they’re in it, and they’re beaten and they’re sweating and they’ve got blisters, and they’re tired and hungry suddenly it’s a bit less fun. But the point of the show was to look for a real hero, someone who can really walk the talk and was willing to learn and adapt and can be positive and resourceful and all these things. The beginning was pretty messy but by the end I really found someone who if my kids were in the jungle and I wasn’t there, I’d want that person beside them, so for me it was actually a really moving journey in a way I almost didn’t expect it to be.”
 
He then speaks of the recent French helicopter tragedy that took place during filming for survival show Dropped:
 
“It’s such a tragedy and it’s a reminder really for me and the crew that we’re like this all day every day, we’re racing around up and down mountains, shuttling around in helicopters, getting gear in and out, and it’s a reminder you can never get complacent. I think the weird dynamic is when we’re a crew there’s a great bond there and a trust but when you’re bringing in outside people such as pilots, and I have seen it before where you work with pilots you haven’t worked with before, there’s a bit of ego and bravado, they want to show you want they can do. I start off really simple, you know ‘whatever you think is safe, we stay 20% to the right side of that. That was such a tragedy, I’m not saying they did anything wrong. Sometimes just disasters happen.”
 
Bear talks about his children, and how his survival instincts are beginning to rub off on them:
 
“They pick it up organically because we’re hanging out all the time and doing this stuff. I love it, I get home and they’re kind of, they’ve found a whole lot of worms or they want to make a raft and do whatever, and part of me just wants to get in and have a cup of tea and put the gear down and get inside, but I love it as well and I see that fire in them. Genuinely we don’t say to them ‘stay off the Playstations or whatever’, they love being outside.”
 
Having turned 40 last year, Bear confesses he is still in denial about reaching the milestone:
 
“I call it 34 plus VAT. I still find it quite difficult, I’m in slight denial. Everyone’s saying ‘are you going to have a big party?’ and I thought ‘actually what I’m going to is wait until I’m 43 and then have a party that I just call a big birthday party and hope everyone thinks it’s a 40th.”
 
Bear also teaches Jonathan how to defend himself in an attack, with Jonathan using a banana as his offensive weapon.
 
Hollywood star Ethan Hawke is Jonathan’s final guest, looking back on his role in hit movie Boyhood and how making the film over a twelve-year period proved logistically difficult for the producers:
 
“It was a logistic nightmare for the producers, it was. Patricia Arquette was on a TV show during that time period and she had put in her contract that whenever Boyhood wanted her she had to be released. But it was a giant headache for sure. Not just for the actors. The kids had Thanksgiving break, the kids had issues that would come up. But luckily we finished.
 
Ethan also rules out the possibility of a sequel, saying “I already worked on that movie for twelve years, I want to move on. I want to play other characters.”
 
Having broken into Hollywood with his appearance in Dead Poet’s Society, Ethan pays tribute to his late co-star Robin Williams:
 
“Every high has a low. He wasn’t an ordinary entertainer. He was a comic genius. He operated outside the box that most of us operate inside. It was very special to meet him as an 18 year old. My first real experience with acting was with somebody who is really touched. Everybody knows people who seem blessed or seem different, and that always comes at a price.”
 
After working with child actors in Boyhood and having seen his The Explorers co-star River Phoenix die of a heroine overdose, Ethan speaks candidly about the dangers of celebrity:
 
“Not to be sad or anything but my co-star in the Explorers died of a heroine overdose. The idea that this is not actually dangerous…it is dangerous. There’s something very exciting and something very dangerous about celebrity and the way the culture chooses to celebrate people, how isolating that can be, and how confusing that can be, and how beautiful that can be.”
 
He also speaks openly about the isolation that comes with fame. 
 
“It’s not hard the way being out in the jungle is hard, but it’s hard in a different psychological way.”
 
“There’s something about celebrity that’s extremely isolating. It puts you behind a glass wall, people tell you you’re different than other people. It makes you feel a lot of different feelings. It was easier for me because I’ve been incredibly fortunate with friendship. I have family – brothers and sisters, who never asked anything of me but to be fair and equal and treat me as a human being. They called me out. I had great friends, starting very young I had good friends who were very serious people.”
 
James Bay will perform at the end of the show.