Honouring our Battle of Britain heroes on 80th anniversary

This year marks the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain, a major air campaign fought in the skies over the UK in 1940. But a number of planned events have been cancelled due to the pandemic, which has left some WWII veterans feeling isolated.

WWII veteran Bernard 'Bunny' Ennis, former RAF Lieutenant John Nichol and Chairman of The Not Forgotten charity David Cowley joined Piers and Susanna on Good Morning Britain to talk about honouring our heroes.

John Nichol thinks it's incredibly important to mark and remember the war saying "If we forget their sacrifice in saving our nation from Nazi domination, what should we remember?"

Bunny Ennis, who enlisted a year after the Battle of Britain and came close to losing his life in 1945, described his experience of serving the country. Plus talked about joining forces with David Cowley to support The Not Forgotten charity.

With many veterans left upset about events either being postponed or cancelled, David explained how the charity has set up a challenge to find every veteran from the Second World War and send them commemorative gifts.

Watch full interview above.

To find out how you can help, visit the The Not Forgotten website

About the Battle of Britain:

From 10th July to 31st October 1940, 3,000 pilots took to the skies in Spitfires and Hurricanes against Germany's air force to fight for control over the Channel, a turning point in WWII. 

On 15th September 1940, the Battle of Britain reached its climax. The Royal Air Force shot down 56 invading German aircraft in two dogfights.  

The costly raid convinced the German high command that the Luftwaffe could not achieve air supremacy over Britain, so on 16th September daylight attacks were replaced with night-time sorties as a concession of defeat.

Fighting continued for another few weeks, but the action on 15th September was seen as an overwhelming and decisive defeat for the Luftwaffe. 

This date is now celebrated as 'Battle of Britain Day'.

More than 500 RAF pilots and aircrew were killed in the Battle of Britain, which led Prime Minister Winston Churchill to declare: 'Never was so much owed by so many to so few.'