Advertisement

  1. ITV Report

Major breakthrough puts scientists on path to first ever stem cell transplantations in people with Parkinson’s disease

Major breakthrough puts scientists on path to first ever stem cell transplantations in people with Parkinson’s disease. Photo: Lund University

A major breakthrough in the development of stem cell-derived brain cells means researchers are on the path towards the first ever stem cell transplantations in people with Parkinson’s disease.

Major breakthrough in Parkinson's stem cell transplants. Credit: Lund University

The next generation of transplantable dopamine neurons produced from stem cells has been presented in a new study published by Lund University.

Cells carry the same properties as the dopamine neurons found in the human brain. Credit: Lund University

It said that the cells carry the same properties as the dopamine neurons found in the human brain.

This study shows that we can now produce fully functioning dopamine neurons from stem cells. These cells have the same ability as the brain’s normal dopamine cells to not only reach but also to connect to their target area over longer distances.

This has been our goal for some time, and the next step is to produce the same cells under the necessary regulations for human use. Our hope is that they are ready for clinical studies in about three years

– Malin Parmar, who led the study conducted at Lund University and at MIRCen
Transplantable cells open the door to clinical application on a much broader scale. Credit: Lund University

The potentially unlimited supply of transplantable cells, sourced from stem cell lines, opens the door to clinical application on a much broader scale. The results are published in the leading journal in the field, Cell Stem Cell.