A British aid worker in Nepal told ITV News "you've entered hell" as he spelled out the challenges of trying to treat earthquake victims inside a perilous hospital.

"It's these patients', these people's worst nightmares," Jonathan Povey, a member of the UK medical team, said.

The perilous state of the clock tower means only 80 of the 800 beds can be used at Nepal's main hospital in the capital Kathmandu.

Many patients are crammed into the building's basement as NHS staff help their Nepali colleagues look after the injured.

Peter Skelton, another member of the UK medical team, warned: "It is what's going to happen to the people next that's going to be the real issue, particularly those that have the most severe injuries.

"If we don't get the right level of caring for them, they're going to face really, really significant challenges when they go out."

The British attempt to ease this part of the crisis is being organised by the Department for International Development and Save the Children, with the hope of tackling the long-term problems as well as the immediate ones.

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