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  1. ITV Report

'Jihadi John': IS confirm death of Mohammed Emwazi

Mohammed Emwazi, the militant known as 'Jihadi John', was believed to have been killed in a US airstrike Credit: .

The death of British militant Mohammed Emwazi, known as "Jihadi John", has been confirmed by so-called Islamic State.

In November, US officials said they were "reasonably certain" he had been killed in a drone strike.

The terror group's English-language magazine Dabiq has now confirmed the news with a eulogising profile in its 13th issue.

A smiling picture of the militant, who appears unmasked looking towards the ground, accompanies the text, which is written in tribute form to a man they describe as an "honourable brother".

Emwazi appeared wearing a mask in several IS videos depicting the murders of Western hostages, including British aid workers David Haines and Alan Henning and US journalist James Foley.

Early last year, he was identified as Kuwait-born Emwazi, a computer programming graduate who grew up in London.

British aid worker Alan Henning was killed in October 2014. Credit: ITV News/Henning family

The article which confirmed that Emwazi was killed in a drone strike said: "His harshness towards the kuffar (disbelievers) was manifested through deeds that enraged all the nations, religions, and factions of kufr, the entire world bearing witness to this."

Dabiq contains articles, interviews and opinion pieces about IS. It is part of a media operation that has produced scores of graphic, professionally produced videos of military operations and the killing of captives in Iraq, Syria and other countries like Libya and Afghanistan.

Emwazi attended Quintin Kynaston Community Academy in north London and went on to gain a degree in information systems with business management from the University of Westminster.

At one point he worked with an IT firm in Kuwait during a stint in the Gulf, but vanished after a failed attempt to re-enter Kuwait in 2013.

It later emerged he had travelled to Syria and had been known to British intelligence services since at least 2009.