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  1. ITV Report

David Cameron urges young people to vote in EU referendum

David Cameron has called on young people to exercise their right to vote in the upcoming EU referendum.

The prime minister said voters can go online and register on gov.uk in just three minutes to secure their participation in the June 23 vote.

"I hope young people do that because this is probably the most important vote they'll cast in their lifetimes," Mr Cameron said.

"It's a vote about their future, about the sort of country they want to grow up in, and their children and grandchildren to grow up in. It's absolutely vital for growth, jobs, prosperity."

Mr Cameron, who spoke shortly after arriving in Japan for the G7 summit, said he hopes as many people as possible vote for staying in a reformed EU.

It's a vote really about having a stronger economy, having more jobs, having lower prices and more opportunities. That's what voting to stay inside the EU is all about - it's about being stronger, safer, and better off.

– David Cameron

Gloria De Piero, Labour’s Shadow Minister for Young People and Voter Registration, said: "It is vital that young people play their full part in this referendum by registering and turning out to vote, so David Cameron’s call to action is very welcome."

Less than half of 18-24s voted at the last general election – and now there is a danger that even fewer young people are registered to vote due to the government’s rushed changes to Individual Electoral Registration (IER).

Cameron is playing catch up on voter registration because he ignored the advice of the Labour Party and the independent Electoral Commission.

– Gloria De Piero, Labour’s Shadow Minister for Young People and Voter Registration

Under the government's new IER system, every person is now required to register to vote individually, rather than by household.

When applying to register, individuals must provide "identifying information", such as date of birth and national insurance number, and applications need to be verified.

A Guardian report found that 80,000 people have been dropped from the register since the changes were introduced.