Remembering the Battle of Jutland 100 years on

Thousands of sailors who lost their lives in the First World War's biggest naval battle were remembered in a series of events to mark the centenary of the event.

The Princess Royal attends a service to mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland at St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall, Orkney. Credit: PA

David Cameron, Nicola Sturgeon and the Princess Royal joined descendants of those who fought at the Battle of Jutland for services on Orkney to remember the 8,648 seamen who died in the most decisive sea engagement of the war.

David Cameron and Nicola Sturgeon attend a service to mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland at St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall, Orkney. Credit: PA

British and German ships engaged in a 36-hour conflict off the coast of Denmark, leading to devastating losses and changing the course of the war.

The Princess Royal and German President Joachim Gauck pass the Weeping Window sculpture made of ceramic poppies. Credit: PA

Crowds lined the streets and British and German military bands played as dignitaries arrived at St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall for the first service of the day.

Guests attend a service to mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland at St Magnus Cathedral. Credit: PA

Guests and descendants later travelled by boat to Lyness Cemetery on the island of Hoy - the final resting place for more than 450 service personnel who died in the war.

A memorial to the officers and men of HMS Malaya at Lyness Cemetery on the island of Hoy. Credit: Reuters

In the order of service, Mr Cameron said: "It is very moving that we are joined today by the descendants of some of those who served at sea during the war.

Wreaths left by guests during a service at Lyness Cemetery on the island of Hoy. Credit: PA

"We stand together with them to pay our profound respects to their ancestors and to ensure that the events of a hundred years ago will be remembered and understood in a hundred years' time."