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  1. ITV Report

David Davis warns Nicola Sturgeon: 'Scotland cannot have a veto over Brexit negotiations'

Scotland cannot have a veto over any deal to leave the European Union - despite new Prime Minister Theresa May suggesting all UK nations should agree a unified approach, Brexit Secretary David Davis has argued.

Scotland could remain part of both the EU and the UK Credit: PA

Speaking to Sky News, Mr Davis dismissed claims by Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon that Scotland could remain in both the EU and the UK.

He said the Brexit decision meant there would be a border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland which posed a problem, and said it would be a mistake to create another border between England and Scotland.

"I don't think that works. One of our really challenging issues to deal with will be the internal border we have with southern Ireland, and we are not going to go about creating other internal borders inside the United Kingdom," he said.

He added:

The aim here is to try to address the concerns of people who are basically Remain people, who say 'well we are worried about inward investment, we are worried about trade with Europe, we are worried about all sorts of things'.

And we will try as best we can - they can't have a veto because there are 17.5 million people who have given us a mandate, they have told us what to do, we can't disobey it - but what we can do is to try to do what we can to minimise any disruption or turbulence or problems.

– David Davis, Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union
Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union David Davis Credit: PA

But Ms Sturgeon said the option of Scotland remaining part of the UK as well as the EU should not be ruled out.

She said Scotland was in a strong position following a meeting with Theresa May earlier this week to discuss the UK's approach to the negotiations.

She also said the EU's attitude towards Scotland's place in Europe had softened since talks in the immediate aftermath of the referendum result, and said she will consider a second independence referendum for Scotland if Brexit negotiations begin without a satisfactory UK-wide apprach being agreed.

The Prime Minister said this week that she will not trigger Article 50 - the legal mechanism for leaving the EU, which starts two years of negotiations - until "we have a UK approach and objectives".

However, Mr Davis said today that Article 50 is likely to be triggered "early next year".