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  1. ITV Report

Most Googled Brexit questions in the UK (and the answers)

  • ITV News Political Correspondent Daniel Hewitt explains the potential fallout above

Theresa May is gearing up for a showdown in Parliament ahead of the crunch Commons Brexit vote on December 11.

MPs will raise their objections to her EU-endorsed withdrawal agreement across five days of debate.

But what are the biggest public concerns?

Here, we answer the most googled questions about Brexit according to Google Trends.

1. What is Theresa May's Brexit deal?

EU leaders have said the current Brexit deal is the best the EU can offer.

The 599 page-long draft withdrawal agreement negotiated with the EU covers citizens rights, the divorce bill, the Irish backstop and fishing among other things.

Here's a short breakdown of the three main issues:

  • Citizen rights

Broadly speaking citizens in the UK and the EU will retain their social and security rights after Brexit.

This means those arriving in the UK to live from now until the transition period ends, which could last until 2022, will have the same rights as those who live in Britain today to live, work and study here.

  • The divorce bill
£39bn
The minimum the UK is expected to pay over the next few years to settle the bill of leaving.
  • The Irish backstop

As one of the most contentious issues of the negotiations, Mrs May initially proposed a technological solution to avoid a hard border.

However, it was rejected by EU and Irish officials.

The compromise involves the so-called backstop.

If both parties fail to reach a long-term trade deal by the end of 2020 that avoids a hard border a single-customs territory between the EU and UK will come into existence.

2. Will Brexit happen?

The European Court of Justice advocate general has rejected the contention that Article 50 can only be revoked after a unanimous decision of the European Council. Credit: AP

The UK can unilaterally revoke its withdrawal from the EU, according to a European Court of Justice advocate general’s legal opinion released on Tuesday.

Manuel Campos Sanchez-Bordona rejected the contention that Article 50 can only be revoked after a unanimous decision of the European Council.

Those who brought the case argue unilateral revocation is possible and believe it could pave the way for an alternative option to Brexit, such as a People’s Vote to enable remaining in the EU.

On December 11, Mrs May will get the final verdict on her deal after the Commons meaningful vote.

The odds are stacked against her but if MPs vote in favour of her deal the withdrawal agreement will be written into law before Brexit day on March 29.

If however, her deal is rejected she could go back to the EU to try to get a more favourable deal for Parliament.

This could see Labour trigger a vote of no confidence in Mrs May's government in the hopes of triggering a leadership challenge.

There is also a push for a second referendum or Britain could leave the EU with no-deal, though a majority of MPs are adamant this will be avoided.

3. What is the backstop in the Brexit negotiations?

The Irish border has proved a tricky issue for negotiators. Credit: PA

The backstop is a last-resort option that will aim to keep an open border in Ireland if a long-term trade deal hasn't been reached by the end of 2020.

It means a single-customs territory between the EU and UK will come into existence.

4. When is Brexit?

Brexit day officially falls on March 29 but Britain wouldn't automatically be out of the European Union.

The 21-month transition period to finalise the exit is set to last until 2022.

5. When is the Brexit vote in parliament?

Sir Keir Starmer has said if the deal is rejected, Labour will table a no-confidence motion in an attempt to force a general election. Credit: PA

The meaningful vote will be held on December 11 in the Commons.

It follows five days of debate on the prime minister's Brexit agreement.

These debates will be key for Mrs May, with a significant number of MPs having already expressed their opposition to the deal.

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer has said if the deal is rejected, Labour will table a no-confidence motion in an attempt to force a general election.

The DUP is reportedly considering abandoning the government in the event of a confidence vote, despite its "confidence and supply" agreement that began after the Tories fell short of a majority following the last election.