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  1. ITV Report

Plus-size style blogger Stephanie Yeboah demands greater inclusivity for eating disorder sufferers

Stephanie Yeboah developed an eating disorder when trying to lose weight ahead of a holiday to Barcelona.

In the quest for a 'bikini body', she lost four stone in four months through a combination of diet pills, fasting and throwing up after eating.

Ms Yeboah secured the look she desired but soon realised it had impacted her mental heath.

"I felt absolutely terrible. I would look in the mirror and just felt really ill for everything I had put my body through," she told ITV News.

Stephanie developed an eating disorder in a quest to get a 'bikini body'. Credit: Stephanie Yeboah

This week marks ‘Eating Disorders Awareness Week’ which is organised by the charity Beat.

Their campaign focuses on dispelling the myth that "only white middle-class women and girls suffer".

A YouGov poll found 39% of adults in the UK believe eating disorders more commonly affect white people while six out of 10 adults believe eating disorders mainly affect young people.

Stephanie said she spent too long wasting time 'adhering to what people say' is beautiful. Credit: ITV News

Ms Yeboah said her disorder was made worse when support was limited because of her weight.

"There's almost like a certain standard of beauty almost within the eating disorder community or the world in that, y’know, it's always very slim people that adhere to what society says is beautiful.

"It excludes all the people that are bigger or a lot of males as well and so I think it just needs to be a lot more inclusive and a lot more diverse."

The blogger now embraces her body. Credit: Kaye Ford

Now a plus size style and lifestyle blogger, Ms Yeboah, believes people should not "waste time adhering to what people say and ... damaging your body."

"A body’s only job is to keep you alive and it's doing a great job of that so don't ruin it," she added.

What to do if you or someone you know needs help:

  • The Beat Adult Helpline is open to anyone over 18. Parents, teachers or any concerned adults should call the adult helpline on 0808 801 0677
  • The Beat Youthline is open to anyone under 18 on 0808 801 0711.
  • Or visit: https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk