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Prime Minister's Twitter tribute to Salisbury Novichok attack features picture of Bath

The original No.10 tweet featuring a picture of Bath. Credit: Twitter/MattChorley

A picture of Bath has landed the Prime Minister in hot water after No. 10's attempt to pay tribute to Salisbury a year on from the Novichok attack went wrong.

The Downing Street Twitter account used a picture of Bath instead of Salisbury accompanied by a tribute that read: "Salisbury has fought back so well from such a devastating and reckless incident - a testament to the resolve, forbearance and positivity of the community."

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The mistake was spotted by Times' journalist Matt Chorley and Twitter users were quick to respond.

More that one social media user asked whether Chris Grayling was behind the post, a nod to Transport Secretary's recent mishaps, including rewarding a ferry contract to a company with no ships.

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Downing Street quickly deleted the original tweet and replaced it with a picture of the front door of No. 10 and a statement from Theresa May that read: “I hope that moving forward Salisbury will once again be known for being a beautiful, welcoming English city and not for the events of 4 March 2018.”

Downing Street blamed "human error" for the mistake.

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Mrs May is visiting Salisbury on Monday, the first anniversary of the Novichok attack which left former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal, 66, and his daughter Yulia, 33, fighting for their lives.

Police office Nick Bailey survived after also being exposed to the nerve agent.

Bath Abbey (L) and Salisbury Cathedral. Credit: PA

Three months later, Dawn Sturgess and Charlie Rowley fell ill and are taken to hospital after picking up a perfume bottle containing traces of Novichok.

Ms Sturgess died two weeks later.

Mrs May visited two shops close to Salisbury Cathedral and met members of the public on the High Street.