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Welcome to The Conversation: A General Election pitch of transformative change is appealing to voters in Telford

Throughout the campaign we will be hearing from people about the issues that are important to them as they decide how to vote.

Tonight in our report 'The Conversation' that's happening up and down the country - Ben Chapman has been to Telford. Sixty three per cent voted to Leave in 2016 - so is Brexit the only issue on voters' minds?

‘Brexit’ is not mentioned once by mothers when talk turns to politics.

Among the squeals, the giggles, the chit-chat on the playmat, there is a word you won’t hear at the young mums’ drop in.

They are told this is the most important election for a generation; one that will shape their children’s futures. But ‘Brexit’ is not mentioned once when talk turns to politics.

The Park Lane Community Centre is at the heart of one of Telford’s most deprived communities. It houses a food bank, and in the reception area, there is a community fridge.

It is the two-child cap on Child Benefit, and plans to downgrade the town’s A&E that really affect the four mothers struggling to make ends meet.

“Maybe it’s time for a change, give Labour a go, and see what they can offer us instead,” says one.

Telford voted to leave the European Union by 63%.

Jeremy Corbyn came to Telford this week, promising to be a ‘new kind of prime minister.’ His pitch of transformative change is appealing here.

Along the corridor, the ‘Better Tomorrow’ project has seen an increase in recovering addicts seeking help to rebuild their lives. The manager blames deficiencies in mental health services.

But one of those learning to make an omelette fears Labour’s ambitious spending plans will put Britain ‘back in the Stone Age’.

“The Tories have already put us there,” another replies, wryly.

One of those learning to make an omelette fears Labour’s ambitious spending plans will put Britain ‘back in the Stone Age’.
In the Sequence Dance Club, there are lifelong Labour supporters who are switching political partners.

But for those among the 63% in Telford who voted to Leave, and still care about honouring it, there is only one choice for prime minister.

“Boris Johnson can put Brexit to bed,” says Sarah, who has never voted Conservative before.

In the Sequence Dance Club, there are lifelong Labour supporters who are switching political partners, frustrated that the pace of Brexit progress has been as slow as their waltz.

Here at least, the contest between the Conservatives and Labour is also a conversation about whether Brexit still matters the most.