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  1. ITV Report

Trump ally Roger Stone guilty of witness tampering and lying to Congress

Roger Stone is a close ally of President Donald Trump. Credit: AP

Roger Stone, a long-time friend and ally of President Donald Trump, has been found guilty of witness tampering and lying to Congress about his pursuit of Russian-hacked emails damaging to Hillary Clinton's 2016 election bid.

Stone was convicted of all seven counts in a federal indictment that accused him of lying to Congress, tampering with a witness and obstructing the House investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia to tip the 2016 election.

He is the sixth Trump aide or adviser to be convicted of charges brought as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

Stone has denied wrongdoing and consistently criticised the case against him as politically motivated.

President Trump wasted little time in responding to the verdict calling it "a double standard like never seen before in the history of our Country?"

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Stone did not take the stand during the trial and his lawyers did not call any witnesses in his defense.

Stone, 67, showed no visible reaction as the verdict was read aloud, count by count. He's scheduled to be sentenced on February 6. He could face up to 20 years.

In a trial that lasted about a week, witnesses highlighted how Trump campaign associates were eager to gather information about emails the U.S. says were hacked by Russia and then provided to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

Steve Bannon, who served as the campaign's chief executive, testified during the trial the trial that Stone had boasted about his ties to WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange, alerting them to pending new batches of damaging emails.

Campaign officials saw Stone as the "access point" to WikiLeaks, he said.

Stone had allegedly close contact with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. Credit: PA

After the verdict was read, prosecutors asked for Stone to be jailed as he awaits sentencing, arguing that he may have violated a judge's order that prohibits him from communicating with the media about his case.

But Judge Amy Berman Jackson rejected that request and said Stone will be subject to same conditions he faced following his arrest, including the gag order.

Throughout the trial, prosecutors used Stone's own text messages and emails - some of which appeared to contradict his congressional testimony - to lay out their case that he lied to Congress and threatened a witness.

Stone did not testify, and his lawyers called no witnesses in his defence.

On Tuesday, a top Trump campaign official, Rick Gates, who was a key cooperator in the Mueller probe, testified that that Stone tried to contact Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law, to "debrief" him about developments on the hacked emails.

During the 2016 campaign, Stone had mentioned in interviews and public appearances that he was in contact with Assange through a trusted intermediary and hinted at inside knowledge of WikiLeaks' plans