The American presidency is perhaps the most powerful and revered position in the world.

But even in the dawn of the republic, the founding fathers - worried that a future leader might be corrupted by power - wondered how Americans could remove a president who had gone rogue.

They came up with an ingenious solution.

This co-equal branch of government, known as Congress, would have the constitutional right to remove the president from office. But it was designed to be difficult; the bar was set high.

The constitution creates a two stage process.

Two-thirds of the the House of Representatives must vote for a simple majority to impeach the president. Credit: ITV News

First, the House of Representatives has to vote by a simple majority to impeach the president - which it has already done.

But that’s just a black mark and an embarrassment.

Remember: An impeached president stays in office. That was the fate of Bill Clinton. Impeached, but remaining as president.

But then secondly there is a trial in the Senate, which begins on January 21.

The 100 Senators are the jurors. They must decide whether the president is guilty of treason, bribery or other high crimes or misdemeanors.

Only if two-thirds of the Senate - 67 Senators - vote to convict the president, is he then removed from office and evicted from The White House.

One hundred Senators must decide whether the president is guilty of treason, bribery or other high crimes or misdemeanors. Credit: ITV News

But that has never happened in American history.

Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton in 1998 were impeached but not convicted. Richard Nixon saw the writing on the wall, and resigned before he was even impeached.

Donald Trump now faces the drama of impeachment here in the coming week.

Will he survive the ultimate test that the founders created 232 years ago?