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'World Anti-Doping Agency is a Russian lapdog,' says one of its former investigators

Robertson said the latest Russia decision is neither a ban nor punishment. Credit: AP

The man who led the original investigation exposing Russia’s state-sponsored doping says rather than being a watchdog, the World Anti-Doping Agency is a "Russian lapdog".

Jack Robertson who quit his role in 2016 makes a scathing analysis of WADA’s decision not to impose a blanket ban on all Russian athletes over the next four years.

Robertson told ITV News: "For all their continued blowhard threats of severe consequences, WADA has proven, yet again, it does not possess the necessary desire or fortitude to fulfill its mission as clean athlete watchdog."

He added: "To be clear, the latest Russia decision is neither a ban nor punishment.

"I no longer hold WADA’s leaders as mere cowards, but also unmistakably intentionally biased."

World Anti-Doping Agency's president Sir Craig Reedie. Credit: AP

Robertson continued: "WADA says Russian athletes will be required to prove their doping innocence to compete this summer in Tokyo.

"Exactly how is this to be conducted WADA?! Pinky swears? This is sheer WADA propaganda and crap," he added.

Russia has been banned for four years from competing in all world events, this includes next year’s Olympics and the Qatar World Cup in 2022.

Although athletes who can demonstrate they are completely clean and untainted by their countries doping scandal will be allowed to take part.

Robertson does not think that is workable - "No athlete, Russian athletes included, can prove conclusively they are clean. Based on Russia’s doping track record clean athletes will once again be pitted against doped Russian athletes for Olympic podium positions."

He said: "WADA has jeopardized a fair field of play and for what reason? Clean athletes and Olympic ideals deserve better than what WADA is providing. Rather than Anti-Doping watchdog, a more appropriate label would now be 'Russian lapdog'."

Russia has three weeks to appeal Tuesday’s decision at the Court of Arbitration for Sport.