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  1. ITV Report

In Pictures: Auschwitz survivors bear scars that are visible and invisible

Marta Wise, an 85-year-old Auschwitz survivor, shows her identification number tattooed on her arm. Credit: AP

Auschwitz survivors still have blue tattoos imprinted on their arms, lifelong evidence of their suffering and loss – one of many ways they continue to warn new generations.

Most survivors are now in their 80s and 90s.

The youngest was only two when the camp was liberated, Eva Umlauf, a 77-year-old practising psychotherapist in Munich.

She says Auschwitz "is deeply burned inside my body and soul”.

A faint tattoo is still visible on her arm - bearing the number A-26959 - which she had branded on the inside of her lower left arm when she arrived at the mass murder camp.

She fainted when the numbers were inked on her arm.

Eva Umlauf fainted when she was tattooed on arrival. Credit: AP

Yevgeny Kovalyov, 92, one of the Auschwitz concentration camp’s survivors, shows the camp’s identification number tattooed on his arm during an interview in Moscow.

Yevgeny Kovalyov shows the numbers inked on his arm. Credit: AP

Auschwitz survivor Marty Weiss poses for a photo at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.

Auschwitz survivor Marty Weiss. Credit: AP

Auschwitz survivor Agi Geva poses for a photo showing her identification number tattooed on her arm at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, in Washington.

Auschwitz survivor Agi Geva. Credit: AP

Holocaust and Auschwitz survivor Leon Schwarzbaum shows his tattooed identification number in his home in Berlin.

Holocaust and Auschwitz survivor Leon Schwarzbaum shows his tattooed identification number. Credit: AP

Mordechai Ciechanower, a 95-year-old, poses for a photo at his home in Ramat Gan, Israel.

Mordechai Ciechanower displays his identification number. Credit: Oded Balilty/AP

Holocaust survivor Maurice Gluck, poses for a photo in his home in Ya’ad, northern Israel.

Holocaust survivor Maurice Gluck. Credit: AP