Daunte Wright's aunt: 'We're being murdered and it's always a mistake'

Hundreds of people attend the funeral of Daunte Wright, as his aunt talks to ITV News US Correspondent Emma Murphy about the pain the family is going through

The aunt of a black man shot dead by police in Minneapolis has spoken movingly to ITV News about the pain of losing her nephew.

Daunte Wright, 20, was killed during a traffic stop on April 11 - nearly a year after George Floyd was killed in the same city.

The officer who shot Mr Wright, Kimberly Ann Potter, said she believed she was using a Taser instead of a gun and has since been removed from the Minneapolis police force. She has been charged with second-degree manslaughter.

"You have so many emotions that go through you. And it all comes back down to the colour of my skin," Naisha Wright said.


  • 'We're being murdered for unjust things and it's always a mistake': Aunt of black man shot dead opens up about her heartbreak of losing her nephew


"The colour of their skin. We're hated from birth and we can't control how we come into this world. Only God has that control.

"But because of the colour of my skin I'm taken out for no reason. We're being murdered for unjust things and it's always a mistake.

"It's always 'let's find out what they did in their life'. But you're forgetting that we're human. We're people as well."

Daunte Wright (pictured top) was shot dead on April 11. Credit: AP

Ms Wright, who will attend her nephew's funeral on Thursday, said she did not believe his death was an accident.

"That's not a mistake. A Taser, bright yellow. A gun, black, dark. Taser eight ounces, pistol two. Dominate side, non-dominate side. "A mistake would be me knocking over a glass of water. I can clear that up. I don't buy that. "I hope the whole world sees that as well."

Protesters confronted police over the shooting death of Daunte Wright at a rally at the Brooklyn Center Police Department. Credit: Protesters confronted police over the shooting death of Daunte Wright at a rally at the Brooklyn Center Police Department.

Mr Wright's death sparked a wave of protests outside the police station and renewed ongoing demonstrations against police brutality throughout America.