New hope for Parkinson's disease

Sheila Roy has been receiving the pioneering treatment at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge Credit: ITV Anglia

A woman from Bedforshire who has Parkinson’s disease can write for the first time in 15 years after receiving gene therapy.

Sheila Roy has been receiving the pioneering treatment at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge.

She is one of 15 people taking part in the test which involves having corrective genes injected into the brain.

The genes provide the coded instructions for proteins needed to make dopamine, a brain chemical essential for proper control of movement.

Lack of dopamine leads to the symptoms of tremor, stiffness and poor balance associated with Parkinson's.

Dr Philip Buttery, from the Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair told Sky News that that whilst the treatment was still in its early stages the results look promising.

Around 127,000 people in the UK suffer from Parkinson's. The disease usually affects those over the age of 50, but one in 20 patients is younger than 40.