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Bearded dragon lizards dumped at bus stop

The RSPCA is appealing for information after two bearded dragons were found dumped in a carrier bag at a bus stop in Hertfordshire. Photo: RSPCA

The RSPCA is appealing for information after two bearded dragons were found dumped in a carrier bag at a bus stop in Hertfordshire.

The lizards were found in a tank in the corner of a wooden bus stop West Commons Way in Harpenden on Easter Monday.

Police were called to the scene and an officer alerted the RSPCA.

The lizards, now named Bruce and Steve, are thought to be around three years old. They are now being looked after at a specialist reptile facility, Ameyzoo.

The pair of bearded dragon, now named Steve and Bruce, are being looked after at Ameyzoo. Credit: RSPCA

"Bearded dragons originate from Australia and require warm temperatures to survive so, being kept in the UK as pets, they are entirely dependent on their owners to provide them with suitable accommodation, heating, lighting, and food.

“Without proper care they can suffer from serious diseases such as metabolic bone disease, dehydration, injuries, parasitic or other infections, and in severe cases or if left untreated, they can eventually die.

“They found were abandoned in a small tank exposed to the elements, on a chilly, wet day - British weather which they are not suited to.

– Kate Wright, RSPCA Animal collection officer
The two lizards, which required warmth, were found inside a tank wrapped in a plastic carrier bag. Credit: RSPCA

The RSPCA says bearded dragons are one of the top five species of reptiles that are collected by inspectors and handed in to its centres.

Other reptiles the charity receives the most calls about include corn snakes, terrapins, leopard geckos and royal pythons.

RSPCA exotics scientific officer, Alexandra Jones, said:

“Exotic pets, particularly reptiles such as bearded dragons, appear to be increasing in popularity and the number of related incidents dealt with by the RSPCA has risen in recent years.

“The needs of exotic pets can be challenging to meet because they are fundamentally linked to certain behaviours, diets or environmental conditions in the animal’s natural environment, that can be difficult to replicate in a home."