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  1. ITV Report

Honouring the Victoria Cross heroes of WW1 from the Anglia region

Soldiers, sailors and airmen from the Anglia region who were awarded the highest military honours.

To mark the centenary of the armistice, ITV News Anglia has been paying tribute to the soldiers, sailors and airmen whose gallantry in the First World War earned them the highest military honours.

The tributes are read by the former head of the British Army, General Lord Dannatt, who was awarded the Military Cross for service in Northern Ireland.

SERGEANT ARTHUR FREDERICK SAUNDERS VC

Sergeant Arthur FrederickSaunders VC 9th Battalion, the Suffolk Regiment

Arthur Saunders, from Ipswich, served in the Royal Navy before joining the Suffolks at the outbreak of war.

The first man from the county to be awarded the Victoria Cross, he and a single comrade armed with a machine gun turned back the advance of a hundred and fifty Germans.

Saunders was severely wounded but survived and went on to serve in the Home Guard in the Second WorldWar.

  • SECOND LIEUTENANT FRANK YOUNG VC

Second Lieutenant Frank Edward Young VC 1st Battalion, the Hertfordshire Regiment

Killed in action on 18 September 1918 at the age of 23

Frank, from Hitchin, joined his regiment as a 14-year-old boy bugler. He served alongside his father on the Western Front.

He was awarded the Victoria Cross after rescuing two comrades captured by the enemy and silencing a machine gun. He was eventually killed after four hours of hand to hand fighting.

  • PRIVATE HERBERT COLUMBINE VC

Private Herbert George Columbine VC The 9th Squadron, Machine Gun Corps

Killed in action on 22 March 191 at the age of 24

Herbert, who lived in Walton-On-The-Naze as a child, was awarded the Victoria Cross for “most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice.”

Following casualties around him, Private Columbine took over a gun and rebuffed enemy advances for five hours. Eventually, he was killed by a bomb. He has no known grave.

  • LT COLONEL JOHN STANHOPE COLLINGS-WELLS VC

Lieutenant Colonel John Stanhope Collings-Wells VC 4th Battalion, the Bedfordshire Regiment

Killed in action on 27 March 1918 at the age of 37

John, from Caddington near Luton in Bedfordshire went to Uppingham School. A career soldier, he was injured in 1915 before returning to the front line.

He was awarded the Victoria Cross after leading his battalion through six days of continuous fighting. Despite two grave wounds, he continued to encourage his men, before being killed by a mortar bomb at the moment they achieved their objective.

  • LT COLONEL HARRY DANIELS VC MC

Lieutenant Colonel Harry Daniels VC MC The Rifle Brigade

Harry Daniels was one of at least ten children of a baker from Wymondham in Norfolk.

A career soldier, he quickly became renowned for his heroism in the trenches of northern France.

In 1915, he braved a hail of machine gun fire to cut through the barbed wire in No Man’s Land. Daniels was shot, but eventually crawled to safety. He went on to win both the Victoria and Military Crosses for “conspicuous and consistent gallantry.”

  • MAJOR EDWARD "MICK" MANNOCK VC, DSO, MC

Major Edward “Mick” Mannock VC, DSO, MC Number 85 Squadron, the Royal Air Force

Killed In Action on the 26th July 1918, aged 31

Mick Mannock, who lived in Wellingborough, was one of the First World War’s greatest fighter aces and one of the most decorated men in the British Armed Forces.

He won the Military Cross twice, the Distinguished Service Order three times and, posthumously, the Victoria Cross. After scores of successful sorties, he was killed during a dog fight. His body was never recovered.

Skipper Thomas Crisp VC The Royal Naval Reserve

Killed In Action on the 15th August 1917, aged 41

Tom Crisp was from a family of Lowestoft fishermen. He was in command of the Armed Smack Nelson which came into contact with a German submarine in the North Sea.

Hopelessly outgunned, the Nelson was hit several times and Crisp lost both his legs. The crew - including his son - took to a lifeboat, but he refused to leave and went down with his ship.

  • COMPANY SERGEANT MAJOR HARRY BETTS MC

Company Sergeant Major Harry Betts MC

The Cambridgeshire Regiment

Killed In Action on the 22nd August 1918, aged 22.

In 1914, Harry Betts left his eight brothers and sisters at the family home near March and headed for France. At 21, he became the youngest CSM in the British Army.

A year later, he single-handedly wiped out a nest of enemy machine-guns, and took 20 prisoners, before his luck ran out. He was killed at the Battle of Amiens, the beginning of the end of the Great War.

  • PRIVATE GEORGE WILLIAM BURDETT CLARE VC

Private George Clare VC

The 5th Royal Irish Lancers

Killed In Action on the 29th November 1917, aged 28

George Clare, from Chatteris, responded to Lord Kitchener’s call to arms at the outbreak of war. Three years later, he was acting as a stretcher bearer, running across open ground continually swept by heavy machine gun fire. He moved between shell holes to warn comrades of a gas attack, but was eventually hit and killed. His body was never recovered.

  • Watch all the tributes in one video

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