Your photos: Altocumulus clouds fill the evening sky across the Anglia region

On Sunday 19th July we were inundated with photos of the same cloud which dominated the evening sky. This cloud is known as Altocumulus.

Meteorologist Chris Page explains more:

Altocumulus clouds are found between 7,000 and 18,000 ft in the atmosphere and look like small puffy clumps. The form due to a shallow layer of mid-level instability (rising air) in the middle layer of the troposphere (from Latin altus, "high", cumulus, "heaped").

Altocumulus tend to form in fair weather situations and are comprised of a mixture of water droplets and ice crystals.

They look fantastic in photographs particularly at sunrise and sunset, where the sunshine catches their underbelly and form beautiful colours of reds, oranges and purples.

Send your pictures to angliaweather@itv.com to feature


Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 - Horningsea Credit: John Challis
Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 - Martham Credit: Nicky
Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 - Grimston Credit: Julie Smart
Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 - Cromer Credit: Karen Hall
Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 Credit: Janey Cotton
Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 - Hemsby Credit: John Newman
Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 Credit: Andrew Brooks
Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 - Ipswich Credit: Graham Meadows
Altocumlus clouds Sunday 19th July 2020 - Spixworth Credit: Barry Stearman

Tips for taking weather pictures

  • When taking a picture to be used on one of our weather forecasts, don't forget to make them landscape - rather than portrait - as this fits the screen better;

  • Also, remember that the weather presenters stand on the left-hand side of the screen, so worth taking note of this when trying to capture that perfect picture to send into us;

  • It's also great if you can tell us where the picture was taken and the name you would like us to credit the picture with.

  • By sending your pictures to us, you agree for us to use them in our weather forecasts to be broadcast on television and online (though the copyright will remain with you at all times, and you will be credited)