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Norfolk veterans paired up with rescue dogs to help mental health

Dogs in need are paired up with ex-service personnel Credit: ITV News Anglia

Norfolk veterans experiencing mental health problems are now receiving help from man's best friend. A new initiative called 'Paw support which is also known as the Canine Stabilisation Programme pairs ex-service personnel with rescue dogs in need of a new home.

It's to help tackle issues such as isolation and build confidence.

"I am convinced that people suffering with mental health issues can find having a dog helpful and beneficial. This is especially the case with people from a military background, who like routine and are used to working as a team. Pairing them with a do in need will help them both."

– Mike, Falklands veteran

Father backs national campaign on mental health

A father from Cambridgeshire whose son killed himself is launching a national campaign to improve mental health care.

Edward Mallen Credit: ITV

18 year old Edward Mallen took his own life at a rail crossing near Meldreth in 2015.

Today his dad Steve will join MPs, NHS trusts and emergency services to launch the Zero Suicide Alliance scheme to try and reduce the national suicide rate.

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Students take a stand against bullying

Three hundred students from across the UK have teamed up to tackle bullying.

Among them were pupils from Aylsham High School in Norfolk, who took part in a day of workshops and discussions as part of Anti-Bullying Week.

The event was organised by the charity the 'Diana Award' with the theme 'all different, all equal.'

Children are being encouraged to celebrate differences and be who you want to be.

Scientists in Cambridge close to a breakthrough in the treatment of MS

Scientists in Cambridge believe they're close to a breakthrough in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

Now Researchers in Cambridge University's stem cell institute want to alter brain cells to make them repair the damage the disease does - causing symptoms like fatigue and sight problems.

Around 100,000 people have the condition in the UK, with around 5,000 people diagnosed each month. In our region it's estimated that 10,000 people have the disease, with 430 people being diagnosed each month.

Click below to watch our report from Stuart Leithes

The Doctor will see you now: For 9 minutes

British patients see their family doctor for less time than patients in many other European countries.

According to a study carried out by Cambridge University, the average average appointment time here is 9.22 minutes.

That's shorter than in Spain, Sweden or Lithuania. In fact it's shorter than 28 of the 67 countries they analysed

The authors wrote that a recent survey of GPs, including some from the UK, found that over a third were "dissatisfied" with the time they could spend with each patient.

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