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Yorkshire " pirate hunters" in Indian court today

Three men from East Yorkshire being held in India for alleged weapons offences are due to appear in court today.

The men on their release from prison in June 2014

Ray Tindall from Hull, Nicholas Simpson from Cottingham and Paul Towers from Pocklington, were arrested along with three other former British soldiers on suspicion of smuggling weapons as they worked onboard a ship providing protection from pirates in October 2013.

The charges were eventually dropped last year .

However they were informed on July 1st that a police appeal against them had been successful and that they would face a full trial in southern India.

The six British men were originally taken into custody after what they thought was a routine paperwork check aboard their security vessel Seaman Guard Ohio. Police seized 35 automatic weapons and nearly 5,700 rounds of ammunition from the ship.

The men had been working for AdvanFort, a private security company providing protection to ships in the area.

Question remains over release of soldiers on bail in India

The hopes of families of of former soldiers from Yorkshire being held in India have been dashed once again - as they face a longer wait to find out when they can return home.

Ray Tindall

Ray Tindall from Hull and Nicholas Simpson from Cottingham were among six British soldiers arrested and jailed as they provided anti-piracy protection for ships.

After many cancelled hearings, both men were released on bail in April, but were banned from leaving the country.

Today they were due to go before a court to get their charges quashed - but this has now been adjourned until Monday.

Ray's mother, Carole Edmonds, told Calendar News she was frustrated and upset by the news.

"It's appalling. It's just never ending. We thought today was going to be the day and that he would be on his way home by the weekend."

Meanwhile, Paul Towers, from Pocklington, remains in prison. He wasn't granted bail in April because he held a senior role on the ship.

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