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  1. ITV Report

Hundreds of 'troubled families' helped by post-2011 riots scheme

The number of troubled families helped by a government scheme to tackle anti-social behaviour has almost doubled in the last six months, official figures revealed today.

Prime Minister David Cameron launched the project in the wake of the riots of summer 2011, pledging £400 million with the aim of helping 120,000 families by May 2015.

The scene of the summer 2011 riots in Birmingham city centre Credit: ITV News Central

This included offering English councils cash incentives to get truanting children off the streets and back in the classroom, helping adults back into work and arresting people causing anti-social behaviour.

So far across the country, 111,000 have been identified for help, with 97,000 being actively worked with, saving an estimated £3 billion.

In the East Midlands, the best performance has been in Leicester, which has reported that more than 78 per cent of its 810 problem families have been "turned around" - one of the highest figures in the country - while in the West Midlands, Warwickshire County Council managed to help 51.2 per cent.

Shops were smashed and looted in the riots Credit: ITV News Central

But other councils have performed significantly less well. Wolverhampton has only managed to help just over 12 per cent of its 810 troubled households, while Shropshire just 17.6 per cent of 455.

In the East Midlands, Peterborough helped 16.9 per cent of 450.

The full breakdown of figures for the region from the Department for Communities and Local Government - from best to worst-performing - is as follows:

  • Leicestershire ... 633 of 810 families - 78.2%
  • Warwickshire ... 412 of 805 families - 51.2%
  • Dudley ... 313 of 740 families - 42.3%
  • Herefordshire ... 126 of 310 families - 40.6%
  • Derbyshire ... 545 of 1355 families - 40.0%
  • Walsall ... 303 of 795 families - 38.1%
  • Derby city ... 232 of 660 families - 35.2%
  • Rutland ... 10 of 30 families - 33.3%
  • Solihull ... 117 of 355 families - 33.0%
  • Nottingham city ... 396 of 1200 families - 33.0%
  • Lincolnshire ... 439 of 1370 families - 32.0%
  • Leicester city ... 346 of 1140 families - 30.4%
  • Birmingham ... 1154 of 4180 families - 27.6%
  • Staffordshire ... 404 of 1390 families - 29.1%
  • Stoke-on-Trent ... 242 of 835 families - 29.0%
  • Northamptonshire ... 307 of 1200 families - 25.6%
  • Telford & Wrekin ... 90 of 365 families - 24.7%
  • Coventry ... 216 of 905 families - 23.9%
  • Nottinghamshire ... 376 of 1580 families - 23.8%
  • Sandwell ... 261 of 1115 families - 23.4%
  • Worcestershire ... 195 of 900 families - 21.7%
  • Shropshire ... 80 of 455 families - 17.6%
  • Peterborough ... 76 of 450 families - 16.9%
  • Wolverhampton ... 100 of 810 families - 12.3%
The riots cost the Midlands more than £1 million in policing costs alone Credit: ITV News Central

The riots cost the Midlands more than £1 million in policing costs alone.

The programme has come under criticism for delays and some councils under-performing, but the Prime Minister today hailed the figures as proof that it was helping families and saving taxpayers' cash.

Getting some of our country's most troubled families' lives back on track is a key part of our long-term plan - it saves the taxpayer money, gives people the chance to get on in life and secures a better future for these families, their communities and for our country.

– Prime Minister David Cameron

Head of the programme Louise Casey said the programme had changed the way councils dealt with families falling into the category, so that instead of several different workers having responsibility for different aspects of helping them, there was just one team or worker providing the support.

This programme works because it is about dealing with all members of the family and all of its problems, being tough but supportive and providing intensive, practical help.

In doing so, they are now seeing results which mean that more families will be able to be helped in the future.

– Louise Casey, programme leader