Advertisement

  1. ITV Report

Plate could end up selling for over £150,000

The plate has had an interesting history so far. Photo: Hansons auctioneers.

A Midlands auction house has had Chinese buyers leap at the chance to purchase an antique plate after it was discovered that replicas exist in two of China’s most famous museums.

Hanson's Auction House now expects the antique could smash £150,000 at auction this Friday.

The plate has had an interesting history so far which began when Scotsman Mr Alexander Robertson emigrated to America and made his fortune more than a century ago.

Credit: Hanson's Auction House.

In 1911 he bought the ancient plate and when he died all his belongings were shipped back to the UK and divided among his relatives.

This plate was one of the items passed down through the generations and was left to some of his descendants, now living in South Derbyshire, two years ago and has been kept boxed up in a kitchen cupboard. Until now.

The plate has had an interesting history so far which began when a Scotsman emigrated to America and made his fortune more than a century ago. Credit: Hanson's Auction House.

A few weeks after it was consigned to auction, Chinese experts revealed that replicas of the plate exist in the National Museum of China and Guandong Museum in China.

In recent years there has been a movement by the Chinese who are passionate about buying back their antiques, many have flocked to the Derbyshire auction house in recent weeks to view the plate privately.

Charles Hanson, owner of Hansons Auctioneers, and the rare plate. Credit: Hanson's Auctioneers.

The rare plate, which carries the reign mark for Emperor Yongzheng and dates back to 1723-1735, goes under the hammer at Hansons Auctioneers in Derbyshire, on Friday.

Charles Hanson, owner of Hansons Auctioneers, said:

“This Chinese plate, which had been hidden away in a kitchen cupboard in South Derbyshire, could now easily exceed £150,000. Interest in it was strong from the start but when we revealed that replica versions of the plate existed in the National Museum of China and the Guangdong Museum, it became extremely hot property.

Potential Chinese bidders have made special journeys to our sale room in Etwall to view the plate privately. There is also a similar plate in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and all of these factors make it even more desirable for Chinese collectors and dealers as well as European 'Chinamaniacs'.

– Charles Hanson, owner of Hansons Auctioneers.

Charles added:

"The 'reverse blue' technique used on the plate dates back to the early Ming dynasty and the Yongzheng emperor, being a noted porcelain connoisseur, commissioned high-quality pieces in the Ming style.

To own such a rare and important piece is hugely appealing to many collectors.The plate had been kept in a box in a kitchen cupboard at a house in South Derbyshire ever since our client inherited it from her granny two years ago. It’s in good condition - even though granny did put a metal plate mount around it! That has now been professionally removed.”

– Charles Hanson, owner of Hansons Auctioneers.