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  1. ITV Report

Rise in fast food outlets across the Midlands as obesity rates reach record high

Credit: Richard B. Levine/SIPA USA/PA Images

New figures show that the number of fast food outlets has risen dramatically over the last eight years across the Midlands.

Leicester gained 130 takeaways in eight years, and Stoke-on-Trent gained 55.

  • The UK has seen a rise of 34% in fast food outlets from 2010 to 2018.
  • In 2010, the average number of fast food outlets per 100,000 people was 47. It had risen to 61 by 2018.
  • The rate of severe obesity among year 6 children (aged 10 to 11) is at a record-high, up by more than a third since 2006 to 4.2%, according to Public Health England.
Credit: FrankHoemann/SVEN SIMON/DPA/PA Images

Number of fast food restaurants across the Midlands in 2010 and 2018, according to analysis from the Office of National Statistics:

  • Leicester 165 > 295
  • Stoke on Trent 120 > 175
  • Sandwell 140 > 220
  • Birmingham 515 > 735
  • Nottinghamshire 120 > 210
  • Peterborough 95 > 125
  • Derby 120 > 160
  • Walsall 115 > 175
  • Wolverhampton 120 > 160
  • Coventry 155 > 210
  • Dudley 145 > 185
  • Derbyshire 305> 425
  • Lincolnshire 315 > 395
  • Northamptonshire 310 > 385
  • Staffordshire 350 > 445
  • Worcestershire 235 > 300
  • Shropshire 130 > 160
  • Leicestershire 250 > 335
  • Nottinghamshire 320 > 395
  • Warwickshire 235 > 270
  • Herefordshire 75 > 80
  • Rutland 10 >15
  • Solihull 70 > 80

We urgently need to take action to tackle child obesity and councils are playing their part, but need more planning powers to help tackle this epidemic, which has made the UK the most obese nation in western Europe....Numerous councils have set curbs on new fast food outlets but current legislation means they lack planning powers to tackle the clustering of existing takeaways already open.

– Councillor Ian Hudspeth, Local Government Association
Credit: John Stillwell/PA Wire/PA Images

Many councils are challenged with striking the balance between a vibrant high street and a healthy one. However, it’s difficult to make healthier choices when our neighbourhoods are saturated with takeaways, restaurants and cafes.

– Dr Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England
Credit: Niall Carson/PA Wire/PA Images

We know these decisions are not always easy for councils, which is why we recently announced our Trailblazer programme to support them to use their powers to best effect.

We are also consulting on introducing calorie labelling for takeaway menus and other outlets including restaurants, to help families make more informed decisions about their food when eating out or getting a takeaway.

– A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson