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Protesters against school LGBT Lessons vow to continue action

Protesters say they will continue action after the half-term break. Credit: ITV Central

Protesters have vowed to continue demonstrations against LGBT teaching at a primary school despite widespread criticism.

The head of Anderton Park Primary School labelled the protests, which have continued for weeks, as "toxic and nasty", adding they are bringing "hatred and division" to the usually quiet Birmingham cul-de-sac.

Lessons ended early today (24th May) for the half-term break after a decision by school leaders concerned about safety amid the protests.

School head Sarah Hewitt-Clarkson said she will not change what is taught at the school in Moseley because of the demonstrations.

She said the school is now seeking an injunction against the demonstrations. She said:

There is a real despair that has made this us-and-them feeling. It's only a small minority of parents and actually a majority are totally fed

It's not peaceful, it is aggressive, it's rude.

Their tactics are very bullying and intimidating, they're meant to crush the spirit of people like me, and other women.

– Sarah Hewitt-Clarkson, Headteacher

She added there had been "sexism, misogyny, racism, on top of all the homophonic stuff and everything else we've had".

The chief constable of West Midlands Police and Education Secretary Daman Hinds have this week both called for protests outside the school to stop.

Mr Hinds said on Thursday that the demonstrations are "unacceptable", adding: "There is no place for protests outside school gates."

Miss Hewitt-Clarkson was also critical of recent remarks by Labour constituency MP Roger Godsiff, in which he said he understands some parents' concerns about how "age-appropriate" elements of the LGBT teaching had been, for children aged four and five.

She praised Labour MP Jess Phillips for telling protesters earlier this week, outside the school, they could not "pick and choose" which equality they apply.

Despite the criticism, the main organiser Shakeel Afsar used a sound system set up in the street to vow protests would be continuing after the half-term break to cheers from a dozen protesters.