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  1. ITV Report

Family trying to raise thousands of pounds for a drug to give terminally ill father extra months to live

The family of a terminally ill man are trying to raise thousands of pounds for a drug that could give him precious extra months to live.

Adam Cattermole, 36, from Littleover in Derby, discovered he had terminal bowel cancer after going to A&E with stomach cramps.

Despite having a tumour removed from bowel, that was the size of an apple, doctors have told him he will never be cured.

Adam's family have raised almost £50,000 to help fund his treatment Credit: ITV Central News

The father of three and his wife Emma say their cancer specialist at the Royal Derby Hospital told them that a drug called Avastin would be the best way to keep him alive.

The drug isn't free on the NHS because of questions over its effectiveness and value for money.

“NICE independent committees weigh up how well treatments work and how much they cost compared to what is already available on the NHS. When our committee reviewed the evidence for bevacizumab (Avastin) to treat advanced bowel cancer they concluded that there were uncertainties around how much it would extend life and it could not be considered value for money on the NHS. Our guidance can be reviewed if any new evidence becomes available.”

– National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence

The couple will have to raise £20,000 for every course of the drug, which could amount to more than £400,000 by the time the full treatment is finished.

Adam's family have raised almost £50,000 for his treatment on a crowdfunding page.

The couple will have to raise £20,000 for every course of the drug, which could amount to more than £400,000 by the time the full treatment is completed.

Adam Cattermole was told Royal Derby Hospital told them that a drug called Avastin would be the best way to keep him alive at Royal Derby Hospital Credit: ITV News Central

"We're incredibly sorry to hear that Adam has been diagnosed with bowel cancer. Although the disease is more common in the over 50's, it can affect people at any age.

"The NHS offer some treatments for advanced bowel cancer patients, but our research shows that not everything that may be clinically beneficial to patients is available."

– Dr Lisa Wilde, Bowel Cancer UK

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