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Police funding boost - a look at the Home Office numbers

Police vehicles in action Credit: BPM Media

Senior police authority leaders have been sharing their thoughts on how much money their forces will be getting, as the Government promises the biggest cash boost for police "in a decade".

Police force funding will increase by more than a billion pounds in 2020/21.

The Home Office said the total amount of funding available could reach more than fifteen billion pounds - if police and crime commissioners ask council tax payers again to stump up extra cash to pay for services.

"This Government is delivering on the people's priorities by giving policing the biggest funding increase in a decade.

It will mean more officers tackling the crime blighting our streets, so people can feel safe in their communities".

– Priti Patel MP, Home Secretary

The Home Office deal includes:

£700m
to recruit 6,000 officers - the first phase of the 20,000 pledged over the next 3 years
£150m
made available to fight organised crime and crack down on online child abuse.
£39m
allocated to tackling serious violence - including #20 million to target county lines drug dealing.
£906m
for counter-terrorism policing, which was announced earlier in the week

So who's getting what across our region, and what do they make of it ?

The numbers for Nottinghamshire:

2019/2020 - £208.9 million

2020/2021 - £225 million

Cash increase - £16.1 million

Nottinghamshire's Police and Crime Commissioner Paddy Tipping Credit: ITV News Central

"Today’s announcement is good news for Nottinghamshire residents.

Everyone will see a more visible police presence. There will be more police officers in their neighbourhoods, communities and streets.

It means 107 more officers for Nottinghamshire in the next year, focussing predominantly on proactive policing in every neighbourhood in the County and the City.

I know this is what people want to see. At the end of the day, they, like me, simply want to be safe and feel safe in their homes and communities.These officers are in addition to the 40 extra officers recruited this year as a result of my budget for 2019-20.

Whilst this is positive news and a big step forward, we need to recognise that it will take three years to get back to the level of officer numbers that existed in 2010. I'm pushing for even more investment.”

– Paddy Tipping, Nottinghamshire's Police and Crime Commissioner

The Commissioner says he can now finalise his plans for the budget for 2020-21, which will be presented to the Police and Crime Panel on 6th February 2020.

The numbers for Derbyshire:

2019/2020 - £180.1 million

2020/2021 - £193.7 million

Cash increase - £13.5 million

Hardyal Dhindsa, Derbyshire Police and Crime Commissioner Credit: ITV News Central

"I’m pleased that we can now present our budget report with some degree of certainty when we meet the Police and Crime Panel tomorrow. It was a little close to the wire.

We obviously need to work through the small print to see exactly what today’s announcement means. However, the headline figures appear to be along the lines on which we based the budget we are presenting to the Panel, but I am aware that the devil can often be found in the detail.

In broad terms, the Government is funding the promised uplift in officer numbers which amounts to something in the region of 85 officers for Derbyshire over the next year.

However, we will still need to meet at least some of the cost of the rather significant inflationary pressures. In short, the financial position is not as rosy as we would wish and I will continue to lobby for increased funding from central sources.

I am hopeful that we will have more certainty on funding for the future after the Comprehensive Spending Review and the three-year budget forecast, which should give us clearer long-term indicators.“However, things could be worse.

The good news for Derbyshire communities is that this settlement means that the professional opinion of the Chief Constable, expressed so eloquently in his open letter, can be addressed and we can continue to strengthen neighbourhood policing, which I know is what matters most to Derbyshire residents.”

– Hardyal Dhindsa, Derbyshire Police and Crime Commissioner

The numbers for Leicestershire:

2019/2020 - £189.3 million

2020/2021 - £203.4 million

Cash increase - £14.1 million

Lord Willy Bach, Leicestershire’s Police and Crime Commissioner Credit: ITV News Central

"Today’s announcement will be welcomed by those calling for more officers in on the streets and in our communities. I echo those sentiments. This is why I invested much of the increase in funding derived from the rise in the police portion of the council tax in 2019-20 in 107 additional officers.

The Government’s uplift will see Leicestershire able to recruit around 80 more police officers in the 2020-21 financial year. They, alongside the extra 107 officers already in my budget this year, will help to increase police visibility and accessibility.

But, don’t forget, Leicestershire Police has lost 550 officers since 2010 as a result of the funding cuts, a position made worse by the present funding formula which financially puts Leicestershire at a disadvantage. In 2006 we had one officer per 430 residents. Today, with the cuts and significant growth in population, we currently have one officer per 600-plus residents and we also tackle an increasingly complex set of challenges, risks and threats.

Clearly we need to look at the detail of the settlement for Leicestershire but at first glance it appears that the Government expects PCCs to increase the amount of council tax paid towards policing by a Band D property by £10 a year. Depending on the property band this amount could be higher or lower.Personally, I believe more funds should come from the Government rather than the local taxpayer, but there is no escaping the fact that we need this increase. Without it we would need to take significant cost-cutting measures.

The Government’s headline grabbing 20,000 additional officers is not all it seems to be. In addition to protecting our current position, there are the infrastructure costs associated with the increase in police officer numbers, recruitment, training, ICT, vehicles and equipment, and those non-salary costs are not captured in the on-costs of police officers.

So, while I cautiously welcome today’s announcement I will wait until the finance team have had time to scrutinise it in full, and what it really means for Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland, before I present my budget to the Police and Crime Panel on 5 February".

– Lord Willy Bach, Leicestershire’s Police and Crime Commissioner

The numbers for the West Midlands:

2019/2020 - £571.3 million

2020/2021 - £620.8 million

Cash increase - £49.6 million

West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner David Jamieson. Credit: PA Images

"At last the government have recognised the damage they have done with ten years of cuts to policing.

This must be the first step in addressing the chronic funding problems thatstill exist.

I am pleased that after years of campaigning we have had some success inchanging the government's direction.

There is much more for them to do though".

– West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner David Jamieson.

The numbers for Staffordshire:

2019/2020 - £196.7 million

2020/2021 - £211.2 million

Cash increase - £14.5 million

The numbers for Warwickshire:

2019/2020 - £102.5 million

2020/2021 - £109.7 million

Cash increase - £7.2 million

The numbers for West Mercia:

2019/2020 - £220.7 million

2020/2021 - £236.8 million

Cash increase - £16.1 million