Authorities turn Buxton's "Blue Lagoon" black to deter visitors

The "Blue Lagoon" in Buxton has deliberately been turned into a jet black lake in an attempt to keep visitors away.

The former quarry in Buxton, which reportedly has the same PH value as bleach, has been attracting thousands of people who have been using it as a place to relax and even swim during the warm weather.

However the large influx of visitors has been causing issues for local residents in Harpur Hill, a village that lies below the quarry.

On Bank Holiday Monday (May 25) residents reported abusive language, piles of litter and people urinating in gardens.

More than 2,000 visitors flocked to the quarry on Bank Holiday Monday. Credit: BPM.

On Friday morning (May 29) at 5am, the local authorities took action to make the quarry look less attractive as a deterrent for future visitors.

High Borough Council and Derbyshire Fire and Rescue poured black vegetable dye into the bright blue pond.

Derbyshire police officers responded by lining every street in Harpur Hill with cones, preventing people from parking on the pavements.

Credit: BPM.

Derbyshire Fire and Rescue say that the quarry is not a tourist site and people are risking their lives by swimming in it.

Open water, such as Hoffman Quarry in Harpur Hill, remains cold nomatter how hot the weather is. This means your body can quickly go into cold water shock causing your heart rate to quicken, you start to gasp for breath and you can quickly become confused and disoriented meaning the chances of drowning increase dramatically even for the strongest of swimmers.

Paul Hawker, from Derbyshire Fire and Rescue
The water contains dangerous chemicals that could be harmful for people. Credit: BPM.

This isn't the first time the local authorities have used dye as a deterrent for the beauty spot.

Derbyshire Fire and Rescue say "the tactic of dying the lagoon has been used in 2012, when the problems of day-trippers started ramping up. It was last dyed in March this year, but it has been dispersed by rain and swimming activity."

The agencies have attempted to contact the site's owners to discuss alonger-term solution, but are reportedly having no luck.

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