Covid-19: Open-air art installation comes to Birmingham to remember victims

The outdoor artwork will be sited in the grounds of Aston Park from 8-16 May and is free to visit in line with Government guidance on lockdown restrictions Credit: Luke Jerram

An open-air art installation to remember the victims of the Covid-19 pandemic is coming to Birmingham as a temporary memorial for the public to visit.

Birmingham Hippodrome - in partnership with BrumYODO and Birmingham City Council - is hosting the artwork from 8-16 May for this year's A Matter of Life and Death Festival.

In Memoriam is an open-air art installation and temporary memorial by artist Luke Jerram, created in tribute to NHS workers as well as for all those who have died during the pandemic.

The memorial consists of 120 flags created from bed sheets arranged in the form of a medical logo.

Visitors to the outdoor memorial will be able to walk through the 120 flags to remember those lost to Covid-19 Credit: Luke Jerram

The outdoor artwork will be situated on the grounds of Aston Park and will be free to visit in line with Government guidance and with Covid-19 safety measures in place.

The installation has been designed specifically with social distancing in mind. People can walk, wander or sit in its midst as they remember loved ones.

The In Memoriam art installation has already travelled to places like Bournemouth and London Credit: Luke Jerram

Last month, a nationwide minute's silence was observed to mark the one-year anniversary since the first coronavirus lockdown. It's hoped this art installation will provide somewhere physical for people across Birmingham to visit and pay their respects.


In Memoriam is a peaceful and reflective installation, and we hope it will support people to mark this extraordinary time and commemorate those who have died from the pandemic.

Antonia Beck, Festival Producer and BrumYODO Director

In Memoriam will be the focus of Birmingham's A Matter of Life and Death Festival - an annual arts and culture event.

This year people across Birmingham can take part in the festival remotely by creating their own, personalised memorial flag.


Not many people have been able to grieve properly, with loved ones unable to visit their relatives in hospitals, funerals cancelled and places of worship and community closed. So there’s a massive need for an artwork that can help us grieve for those we’ve lost.

Luke Jerram, Artist, In Memoriam

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